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Ringrost 20180306

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11 replies to this topic

#1
Merco_61

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The photos with 105 in the filename are shot with the D700 and 105DC, the others with the D7200 and Tamron 17-50.

If someone wonders about the EXIF, just follow the Flickr link.

 

First a shot of the conferencier as he started the evening off.

39764437485_58c0b29b26_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_17-58-32_105mm_ by merco_61, on Flickr

 

Then the band...

40658970071_d2faf79a4a_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-00-20_35mm_ by merco_61, on Flickr

 

26788261778_c497c284a1_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-02-02_105mm_C by merco_61, on Flickr

 

39949318754_588b00d74e_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-02-08_48mm_A by merco_61, on Flickr

 

26788260548_b08d3df476_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-02-20_105mm_B by merco_61, on Flickr

 

40617507572_b248162009_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-02-31_105mm_A by merco_61, on Flickr

 

26788258578_0615d22d83_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-05-19_105mm_B by merco_61, on Flickr

 

25788494017_781d1d6316_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-05-42_105mm_ by merco_61, on Flickr

 

26788256298_d4607ddb20_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-06-01_105mm_A by merco_61, on Flickr

 

25788492197_19c3a86465_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-06-08_105mm_D by merco_61, on Flickr

 

40617145222_7010ff5129_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-07-14_50mm_A by merco_61, on Flickr

 

38848918340_ff7b024ab5_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-09-03_40mm_D by merco_61, on Flickr

 

38848921860_21d85bffa6_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-09-03_40mm_B by merco_61, on Flickr

 

39764030215_ee1b5a1fd2_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-09-04_40mm_ by merco_61, on Flickr

 

38848911710_0b6f29c62d_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-09-07_40mm_ by merco_61, on Flickr

 

26788254288_e2b490c295_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-09-32_105mm_A by merco_61, on Flickr

 

39764027455_ec6201dc4f_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-10-42_38mm_E by merco_61, on Flickr

 

38848906560_b87b5517d6_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-10-43_38mm_B by merco_61, on Flickr

 

25788489787_c4d7309aec_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-15-08_105mm_A by merco_61, on Flickr

 

26788251918_bd794cf1c2_o.jpgPES_2018-03-06_18-15-12_105mm_B by merco_61, on Flickr

 

 



#2
Steve M

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At a 1/60 Shutter Speed you really keep your photos crisp. Even the hands strumming the quitars seem very crisp. The drummer has some blur on his hands and sticks but that is good as it gives action to the photo.

Great work! Heck if I lived close to you I would love to tag along with you.

#3
TBonz

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Nice shots Peter!  I like the 105 - great length for some of those images...



#4
Merco_61

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Tom, the 105DC is *very* crisp when the aperture is stopped down a bit and the DC control is zeroed out. It used to be Nikon's sharpest short tele before the 105/1.4 came along. An 105 on FX is definitely easier to use like this than an 85 on DX. I would really like if Nikon made a fast 70 for DX. I wonder how the Sigma 50-100/1.8 would work?

 

Steve, holding still at these relatively slow speeds is a matter of practise, unless you have a tremor... Having spent countless hours practising control line precision aerobatics when young doesn't hurt either, neither does a background in shooting both .22 and 9 mm pistol competitively.



#5
Steve M

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Tom, the 105DC is *very* crisp when the aperture is stopped down a bit and the DC control is zeroed out. It used to be Nikon's sharpest short tele before the 105/1.4 came along. An 105 on FX is definitely easier to use like this than an 85 on DX. I would really like if Nikon made a fast 70 for DX. I wonder how the Sigma 50-100/1.8 would work?
 
[b]Steve, holding still at these relatively slow speeds is a matter of practise, unless you have a tremor... Having spent countless hours practising control line precision aerobatics when young doesn't hurt either, neither does a background in shooting both .22 and 9 mm pistol competitively.[\b]



One thing that has helped me since my problem of movement is at pushing the shutter button is I will take a few shots in a row with the shutter down.

#6
TBonz

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Peter - It would be nice to get a fast 70 for DX bodies...I do love the 105 on FX though...just seems to fit my eyes...I am sure the flying and shooting would help with the steady...I did lots of practice and testing back in the day so I knew what I could and could not hand hold with any given lens...I WAS pretty good...definitely not as steady as I used to be, but I still work at it...high shutter speeds and multiple frames both help me get a few more keepers!

 

Looks like I'm going to shoot rugby again this weekend...trying to decide if I want to put the 200-400 on the D500 or keep it on my D4...I know, it is a nice "problem" to have! :)  My wife is going to shoot with the 70-200 and I'll be shooting with the 200-400...might just bring the two bodies / lenses...



#7
ScottinPollock

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holding still at these relatively slow speeds is a matter of practise, unless you have a tremor... Having spent countless hours practising control line precision aerobatics when young doesn't hurt either, neither does a background in shooting


Practice is great if you know what to practice. I have mentioned this guy before, and while he is quite the pedant, a quick look at various hand holding technique vids on YouTube found his to be the most sound (IMHO).

 

https://youtu.be/K2liHVevjGw

https://youtu.be/U-oA9iHFePM



#8
Steve M

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Practice is great if you know what to practice. I have mentioned this guy before, and while he is quite the pedant, a quick look at various hand holding technique vids on YouTube found his to be the most sound (IMHO).

 

https://youtu.be/K2liHVevjGw

https://youtu.be/U-oA9iHFePM

I have watched the first one.   Great ideas this guy give.   They won't come easy but if you just force yourself to follow his ideas they will come natural.   The second video I will watch this evening.   Thanks for posting



#9
ScottinPollock

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They won't come easy but if you just force yourself to follow his ideas they will come natural.

You certainly don't need to copy him verbatim: I find his left "claw" hand creates to much tension. Maybe his hand is more flexible than mine but I prefer just to keep my left hand relaxed, folding my fingers over so nails are pointing towards my palm and just letting the lens rest on my knuckles.

Also not that big a fan of the "wrist grab", but the shoulder grab works well with heavy glass.

I think the most important point to focus on is that you don't control/hold the camera with both hands. You control with the right and simply support with the left hand/arm/elbow. As Peter said it is much like target shooting... you don't grab the gun with both hands but with one, supporting with the other.

#10
Steve M

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You certainly don't need to copy him verbatim: I find his left "claw" hand creates to much tension. Maybe his hand is more flexible than mine but I prefer just to keep my left hand relaxed, folding my fingers over so nails are pointing towards my palm and just letting the lens rest on my knuckles.

Also not that big a fan of the "wrist grab", but the shoulder grab works well with heavy glass.

I think the most important point to focus on is that you don't control/hold the camera with both hands. You control with the right and simply support with the left hand/arm/elbow. As Peter said it is much like target shooting... you don't grab the gun with both hands but with one, supporting with the other.

Agreed.   When I get home tonight I will try all of his methods.   I am sure as you said there is things you don't like and I may find something I do like not even in his videos.   It is practice.



#11
Merco_61

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I have never understood the claw grip. With a twist zoom lens, I form an L with the thumb and first finger so I am able to change the focal length without changing how I support the lens. Wrapping a hand around the lens just can't work as the important thing is to support the lens, not hold it.

 

With a long prime or push-pull zoom, I use thumb and long finger all the way out on the lens hood or right behind it to get as much stability as possible.

 

In both cases, the elbow is pulled in, so the arm is as straight under the lens as I can.



#12
TBonz

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Agree Peter...I do the same with all types of the lenses as you describe...That is so "natural" now in terms of grip...hard to describe, but while I am "aware" of it and thinking about it, I just naturally brace as best I can with whatever my options are without even thinking about bracing...left hand placement differs when using a monopod though...at least usually...