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Sticky F100 Camera Body

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16 replies to this topic

#1
jhskyline

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I have a venerable F100 camera. Like most, I have graduated to digital cameras. The F100 was well taken care of, and would make a nice addition to a film Nikon collection. However, the faux leather material on the body has become sticky with age. When I took the camera in for possible consignment, the camera shop technician said this was not uncommon with old F100s, and said he probably couldn't sell it in that sticky condition. So, has anyone experienced this with their old camera bodies, and does anyone know how I might treat or seal the camera body to get rid of the annoying stickiness? Thanks.   



#2
Merco_61

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If it was leatherette, there wouldn't be a problem... The textured rubber grips on the F5 and F100 breaks down with age and exposure to ozone. To get it usable for your own use, corn starch might remove the stickiness, but to sell it you should change them out.



#3
Jerry_

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I agree with Peter, even so I would use tallow rather than corn starch

#4
Ron

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My N90s has the same problem... which actually started while I was still using it regularly. It got to where I used to hate to use the camera but I've put off having the material replaced. I had one of my Minolta cameras reskinned at a Minolta service center and they did a terrible job. The new material didn't last a year. 

 

I'd really like to use the N90s some more... I've still got a batch or two of slide film in the freezer.

 

--Ron



#5
Ron

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Feeling dumb now...

 

The stuff on the back of my N90s was/is just sprayed on grip material. 91% alcohol easily removes it. I never knew.

 

--Ron



#6
Tony

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I have a venerable F100 camera. Like most, I have graduated to digital cameras. The F100 was well taken care of, and would make a nice addition to a film Nikon collection. However, the faux leather material on the body has become sticky with age. When I took the camera in for possible consignment, the camera shop technician said this was not uncommon with old F100s, and said he probably couldn't sell it in that sticky condition. So, has anyone experienced this with their old camera bodies, and does anyone know how I might treat or seal the camera body to get rid of the annoying stickiness? Thanks.   

I had the same problem with mine. I used acetone, or better known as nail polish remover. A little dab'll do ya.  Worked just great.  Tony



#7
Merco_61

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Acetone should work, but be careful as a spilled drop on the hard plastic will soften the surface. Finger prints in the shiny surfaces is not a good look.



#8
jhskyline

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Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I guess the material on my F100 is genuine leather or some facsimile. Definitely not painted on. We tried the acetone and it seemed to take some color and dirt off, but the surface was as sticky as ever. Tried fingernail polish, too, and it didn't work. I don't know what tallow is -- something out of Oliver Twist or Charles Dickens :)? Am thinking some sort of urethane product might seal-in the sticky leather surface. If I can solve this issue, I should be able to get a few dollars for that good old film camera. Surprised Nikon itself doesn't recognize the problem and offer a solution. Maybe they do... 



#9
Merco_61

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The material is textured synthetic rubber and responds well to very lightly dusting your hands with corn starch and then handling the camera, followed by blowing any surplus off the camera with a Rocket blower. The stickiness is usually started from either being stored too close to an ozone source or handling the camera with insect repellent on your hands. It was a terrible choice of material that was used on the F80, F85, F100 and F5.



#10
jhskyline

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Is corn starch a permanent solution, or would I have to dust my hands every time? Thanks for the information about this problem. (I hitch-hiked through Uppsala and all the way to Lapland north of the Arctic  Circle back in my youth during a year-long round the world adventure.)



#11
Merco_61

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It isn't permanent, but it lasts for quite a while between treatments. It seems that the corn starch fills the pores in the covering and stays there.



#12
Jerry_

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I realize that their was a typo in my posting - sorry

The powder I mentioned as Tallum should be read as talcum - or talc ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talc ) - I hope this clarifies.

The reason why choosing talcum over corn starch is that corn starch is a biologic product that could attract bacteria, while the talc wouldn't do so.

#13
jhskyline

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Oh, talcum powder! I'll give it a try, but my instinct is that powder (dust) and cameras are not good bedfellows. I can imagine it getting on the sensor --- oh, that's right no sensor on the F100! I sure wish there was something to seal the stickiness. Thanks for the suggestion, Jerry.

#14
Astro Baby

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A lot of gear from that period used a synthetic material for the leatherette. It just decays with time. One of the worst for this is the Olympus E10 and E20 models. You can treat but ultimately it will just start to disintegrate and it can be a massive headache as it slowly turns into a tar like substance thet gets on your hands and if your not careful onto stuff like lenses (which aint good).

When I have come across I find a bit of Isoprop will remove it quite readily.....my E20 had to be scarped off with an old credit card. For the E20 its impossible to replace due to the complex curves but most cameras can be fairly easily reskinned which is what I would do assuming you still want to use the camera. Not so sure it would be economic if the aim is to get it sold.

#15
daveFM2

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You haves used most of the products I would recommend for the removal of the sticky substance. For reattaching leather or faux I recommend Pliobond. It is an industrial cement the I have used to join a piece of plastic on a Leica winder R. Let it sit for 4-5 days and it’s like new. Be warned it comes with a strong smell.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

#16
Theov39

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This sounds weird but I found that Tyre Black works! This is the spray on liquid to make your old tyres look black and shiny. I had a F100 with that issue and tried it and it works. Another option is using silicone spray. I took the view that I had nothing to lose so tried a few different things and tyre black worked for me. 



#17
lightcapture

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I know this is an old post, but I'm a new member so I'm posting this to help others.

A small bottle of Goo Gone is the best product for removing sticky residue.







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