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Steenkin' Humidity


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9 replies to this topic

#1
Cjtamu

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Kim and I have been wanting to post some Texas themed photos here. Finally, the longhorn steer we've been waiting for came to the fence today. BUT. It's that time of year where we are in 90-100 deg F weather (that's about 32 to 38 deg C for those not in the Continental US) every day, and humidity usually 85-100%. And anytime you get out of the AC, including the car, camera fogs. Lens dissipates fairly quickly, but I suspect it's the mirror or image sensor that takes longer to clear up. All the shots I took were just worthless. Makes it look like the entire picture is blurred, similar to camera shake. After about 20 minutes things equilibrate, but tired of missing shots because we can't just go outside and shoot.  Anyone know of a cure? 



#2
Merco_61

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I don't have much experience with hot, humid conditions, but I guess that a silica gel pack or two in the camera bag might help at least some.


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#3
Ron

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What Peter said (about silica gel packs) is a good idea... and, keeping your camera in the bag while it's inside the car and not being in any hurry to pull it out once you get out of the car. Let temperatures stabilize a bit before attempting any photography. Also, sometimes, setting the camera bag on the floor in the back seat area or trunk helps.

 

In most cases however, being patient is the best solution. Especially when the dew point is in the upper seventy or low eighty degree range.

 

--Ron



#4
TBonz

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Yep...I've had it happen and the ideas above are good...same thing happens along most of the south east coast of the US although today is only about 50% humidity and 90 F here.  I've even seen the reverse once or twice when shooting a game on a cold night and bringing my gear inside afterwards...

 

I try to minimize the time my gear is in the cold if I am shooting outside in the heat (and the opposite as well).  I also tend to try to get to where I am shooting early so that the gear (and I) can adjust to the temps.  Getting there early also gives me time to figure out my best angles / good spots to shoot from, especially if I am shooting a new location...


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#5
Cjtamu

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Thanks. We have small silica gel packs, looking for the rechargeable containers. Truth is, I think they do more to protect the camera from our nasty humidity than anything. Don't seem to have much effect once the camera hits ambient air. Normally we've been letting cameras sit for a bit, just no way to do it for subjects like yesterday. My camera bag usually rides on the car floor, so that's covered. Might try the hatch area.


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#6
Merco_61

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If the air inside the mirror box is dehumidified, there should be less condensation on mirror and sensor to contend with.



#7
ScottinPollock

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FYI... most silica dessicant can be recharged by warming in a low oven for an hour or two. They even have some that changes color to indicate its moisture content (although there are conversations online about possible toxicity with the color changing variety).
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#8
Cjtamu

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I never liked the color change dessicants, we just used a gauge and dried when needed, but not really possible with this application. I'll have to read  up and see what the indicator made of. The AC is of course also a dehumidifier, particularly in the house where we can control pretty precisely. The temperature difference outdoors is just so extreme, it still fogs as soon as you go outside. Going to try more dessicant and see if it makes a difference.



#9
nikdood17

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I HATE humidity. It's about 10 percent where I am right now. Hot but dry.



#10
Cjtamu

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I HATE humidity. It's about 10 percent where I am right now. Hot but dry.


+1. Lived near this area all my life and have never liked the weather this time of year. BTW, pulled my camera out of the car yesterday after implementing all the above tricks. Was 92 F, heat index I think about 104? Camera fogged before I finished removing lens cap ha ha. I think there's no solution for it in the swamp in which we live, other than letting camera sit outside for a bit.