Jump to content

Welcome to NikonForums.com
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Best Tripod Head for Wildlife Photography


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
meganhaderphotography

meganhaderphotography

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Country Flag

I got a Tamron 150-600 for Christmas and am in love with it.  My tripod has a ball head but I know I need something better for this lens.  I'm looking into the different types of tripod heads and I need some advice on what to buy.  I shoot mostly wildlife and need something sturdy that moves in all different directions so I can follow it.  I've been leaning towards a Gimbal head but will it let me follow something if it goes off to an angle instead of just up and down or right or left.  Thanks for the advice!



#2
nbanjogal

nbanjogal

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,804 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUT, USA

Site Supporter

I also have this lens and am looking for something a bit more solid to put it on. I met a photographer at Shooting the West a couple of years ago who put his giant lenses on some heavy old Gitzo legs and a Wemberley gimbal head--he got great results (was able to shoot a smooth time lapse with an enormous lens!), so I've had my eye on that combination for awhile. I wrote down the brand names, but, alas, didn't think to write down model numbers. I've been keeping a casual eye on used gear to see what pops up in those brands because they're pretty pricey, but it's not a huge priority for me right now so I'm not checking too often.

 

Anyhow, I don't have a solid answer for you--I'm answering mainly because I'm also curious. I'm sure someone in the forums will have some good suggestions though.



#3
Wayben

Wayben

    Active Member

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationIowa

Site Supporter

The Wimberley WH-200 is probably what you are thinking of.  I'm very happy with mine, very smooth movement in all directions and rock solid.  It is the best head I've found for long lenses.  The only downsides are it's big, heavy, and expensive.  However, the big and heavy is part of what make them work so well with big lenses and cameras.



#4
nbanjogal

nbanjogal

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,804 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUT, USA

Site Supporter

The Wimberley WH-200 is probably what you are thinking of.  I'm very happy with mine, very smooth movement in all directions and rock solid.  It is the best head I've found for long lenses.  The only downsides are it's big, heavy, and expensive.  However, the big and heavy is part of what make them work so well with big lenses and cameras.

 

Yes, I'm pretty sure that is the model I am thinking of. Big and heavy is fine as long as you don't have to backpack with it, right? What legs do you use, Wayben? I'm hoping to do more time lapse, and I'd like to use my big lenses for it occasionally. The big lenses are not ideal for that, but having a rock solid foundation can help. 



#5
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,601 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

I have used a wimberly WH-200 a bit on a Sachtler Eng2. Definitely sturdy. The Eng2 is a bit sturdier and has less resonance problems than a Gitzo Series 5 Systematic. If it is too expensive or too clumsy to lug around, the 75 Speed-Lock is about equal to a Series 4, but with less resonance. If these European high-end tripods are too expensive in the States, check what surveyors use in your market as that is what the Sachtlers are originally developed for. It might be easier to find a Cratoni than a Sachtler as I think they sell a bit more on your side of the Atlantic.



#6
Jerry_

Jerry_

    Nikonian

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,064 posts
  • Country Flag
I am using the Benro GH-2C as a gimbal - and one of the main reasons to buy it was my Tamron 150-600.

It looks very much the same than the WH-200 but is made of carbon fiber (so slightly less heavier) and has some graduation markings (not that relevant for wildlife, but for produsing different captures to be stitched together)

What I didn't like on the Benro GH-2C was the Arca style plate that was included. It could only be fixed with a tool and didn't have any rubber, which made the lens having a slight freedom of movement when being attached for a while. Therefore I am now using a Sirui rubber coated plate and since, there is no more movement in the setup.

As regards your question for following in an angle: If none of the two breaks (horizontal and balance) is blocked, you can follow f.i a bird in an angle.

#7
Wayben

Wayben

    Active Member

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationIowa

Site Supporter

I have a Bogen 3236 tripod that I use if I don't have to carry it very far.  Also, Bogen 3020 if I'm going any distance, not quite as sturdy, but considerably lighter.  They are both aluminum.  I'm pretty happy with them both, but one of these days I'd like to try a good carbon fiber set to see if I can get the same sturdiness with less weight.



#8
Bobby18120

Bobby18120

    Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNEW JERSEY

My next buy will be the   Sirui PH-20 Gimbal Head