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The New Nikon D7500: Superior Performance That Drives The Desire To Create


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10 replies to this topic

#1
Adam

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Exceptional Speed, Precision and Low-Light Ability Has Never Been as Attainable; The New D7500 Uses the Same Powerful Imaging Sensor and Includes Many Features from Nikon’s DX-Format D500 Flagship Melville, NY (April 12, 2017) - Enthusiasts are a distinct type of photographer, who go to great lengths in the relentless pursuit of the perfect capture. It is for this user that Nikon…

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#2
Russ

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If I had a 7200 I wouldn't bother.



#3
Brian

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I find it strange that Nikon put this camera in the D7000 series, but it does not have an Ai coupling for use with non-chipped lenses. I would not consider it for this reason. It would have been much less confusing to have put this in the D5000 series of cameras.



#4
Merco_61

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It would be a step backwards in the D5xxx series as well as the screen isn't fully articulated. If we see the D7xxx series as the video DSLR segment going forward, the feature set makes a bit more sense. What they have missed then is the fact that the VDSLR crowd love the old Ai and Ais lenses for how they draw.



#5
Ron

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Thom Hogan considers the D7500 a step up in spite of it's shortcomings. I suppose it all depends on how you plan to use the camera and what your priorities are. 

 

For me personally, it seems like a step down even with the new sensor. And, I believe that many people for whom the D7xxx series is aimed towards will feel the same way. It does seem to be aimed more towards the video crowd and that's not really my bag so maybe I'm not being fair. It will be interesting to see how it all shakes out but I can't help but think of all the people who bought D3400's expecting them to have a least the same feature set as previous cameras in that group and then being disappointed to learn that it isn't the case. 

 

I've already seen posts on other forums wondering about which vertical grip the camera will use, and whether their older lenses will index properly. They have generally been disappointed at the answers. 

 

--Ron



#6
ScottinPollock

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For me, the 7000 series was all about better build quality and older lenses (both AF and Ai(s)). Now they have taken two thirds of that away. So we now have three classes of DX bodies with three different lens compatibility charts. Looks like Nikon wants their customers to be as confused as they are.

 

And it's hard to believe this is gonna attract videographers with Sony and Panasonic around, given the same autofocus as the D7200 (plain ol' contrast detection). Yes it has aperture control for non-EM lenses, but if it won't focus worth a damn what's the point (folks are still gonna go manual).

 

I get that the AI indexing is a pricey feature... but its 1250 bucks! And it is all plastic! With one SD card slot. It certainly is not for me... hopefully they will not completely screw the pooch with the upcoming mirrorless for if they do, it is time to go Sony or Fuji.



#7
charles76

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I'll post once i get one in hand. I should have this issued straight from the source. mid-summer.



#8
Jerry_

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Usually you would expect that a camera is a step up if it is placed in the same product line.

However, to me, the D7500 does not build on features of the D7x00 line, making it the camera to move over to the PRO bodies. This means better build quality, support of older lenses, two memery card slots, better ergonomics.
Ok, the ergonomics are better than in the D5x00 product line, where Nikon has screwed up ergonomics since the D5500. However, if there should be no grip available that would be a serious step backwards for semi-Pros, or Pros who would like to use it as a backup camera.

If Nikon really wants to enter the camera segment, they should have made it a productline of it own.

The only good aspect in this numbering is that (while Nikon will argue that they have issued a new camerabody in the D7x00 line) the price for the D7200 will drop.

#9
Ron

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It's pretty much confirmed that the D7500 will not (officially) support a vertical grip. There are no contact points or alignment pin holes on the bottom of the camera. Also, the AI(S) index lever is missing so that's also confirmed. It is all plastic with no magnesium alloy frame. NFC is gone although it's been replaced by something else.

 

And, of course, the dual cards slots are missing. This is less of a biggie than many people make it out to be. Many amateurs don't use the second card slot anyway and even on a D500, since the second slot only supports SD, it only serves to slow down the entire camera if you use XQD cards in slot 1.

 

However, some people who shoot B&W with D7xxx cameras tell me they use two cards, writing RAW in slot 1 and low quality jpeg in slot 2 so as to be able to use the monochrome picture control and see a monochrome image on their monitor (without filling up card 1 with jpegs).

 

And, there are aftermarket companies that make grips for Nikon cameras that don't officially support grips. Their quality is, as one might expect, variable.

 

So, yeah. The D7500 is certainly a mixed bag. Personally, I don't see myself buying one (although, had they left in AI(S) indexing, the mag frame, the grip, and the the dual SD slots while adding the D500 sensor, I would have been seriously tempted... even if they had bumped the price another US$150.)

 

--Ron



#10
Brian

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I guess this one is kind of like the Nikon EM compared with a Nikon EL. Both started with an "E".

They should have made it a "6000" series, would have been less confusing and reflective of the missing features compared with a 7200.



#11
Fred588

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Rather more than a year ago, before the d7500 was officially announced, I had money set aside for a purchase. I used that money for something else, however, as I already have a d7200 and the d7500 seemed a step backward. I know it can do 4k video but I already have three dedicated video cameras for that. What would have made the sale was an INCREASE in pixel resolution, not a decrease. A year and almost a half later my view has not changed. If my d7200 were to start to fail or become damaged I would get another d7200. 


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