Jump to content

Welcome to NikonForums.com
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

D5300 Autofocus - Wildlife

d5300 autofocus

  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1
austinkiker

austinkiker

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Country Flag

Hello all,

 

When shooting wildlife I have my D5300 set to 39pts of focus (the most it offers - lots of BIF) and AF-C (continuous-servo).  I also use matrix metering.   I shoot 98% of the time in Manual mode so I want to ensure I have those autofocus and metering settings setup properly for wildlife.  Thoughts?

 

Thanks for your help,

 

Austin 



#2
Daniel

Daniel

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 512 posts
  • Country Flag

Site Supporter

Hello all,

 

When shooting wildlife I have my D5300 set to 39pts of focus (the most it offers - lots of BIF) and AF-C (continuous-servo).  I also use matrix metering.   I shoot 98% of the time in Manual mode so I want to ensure I have those autofocus and metering settings setup properly for wildlife.  Thoughts?

 

Thanks for your help,

 

Austin 

I shoot in single focus point with AF-C. 



#3
Jerry_

Jerry_

    Nikonian

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,442 posts
  • Country Flag

I shoot in single focus point with AF-C.


So do I

#4
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,294 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

And another vote for single-point AF-C, at least when I use AF at all.

I use center-weighted metering or even spot rather than matrix for predictability. As the metering bias with matrix depends on comparing to a database, you never know if the camera has identified the scene correctly. I don't like to let the camera computer decide things without telling me.



#5
austinkiker

austinkiker

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Country Flag

Thanks for your insight, folks.  I'll put that knowledge to the test and see what sort of results I get.  I'm excited to try this out.



#6
Wayben

Wayben

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationIowa

Site Supporter

Single point AF-C and spot metering here too.  Fewer chances for the camera to make wrong choices.



#7
austinkiker

austinkiker

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Country Flag

Great, thank you.



#8
Ron

Ron

    Nikonian

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,876 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationMagic City

When I use AF-C at all, I usually use single point AF-C. Having said that, I'll add that I've also used multiple point AF-C with some success. When it works, it's great. But you are turning a lot of control over to the camera.

 

Ditto with matrix metering. I usually use either center weighted (mostly) or spot (occasionally).

 

--Ron



#9
austinkiker

austinkiker

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Country Flag

I'm going to throw a curve ball here.  I was sitting on a river bank photographing a Bald Eagle flying overhead on a sunny, clear day when these three guys popped their heads up, curiously watching me (see photograph).  As you more able photographers than myself know, it is tough to switch settings fast enough to keep up with the drastic and sudden changes in wildlife.  I swung my camera down from photographing a bright blue sky and single subject (eagle) to murky waters and three subjects.  Let's forget the need to change iso, shutter speed etc, and stay focused on the points of focus and metering.  What would you use to photograph these three otters, keeping in mind they are not stagnant objects.  They were bobbing their heads in and out of the water etc.  You might notice the otter standing tall in the background has a bit of a blur to him, there was a limb in the way.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 3Otters.jpeg


#10
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,294 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

I had to think about how I do things in such a situation. As I use center-weighted metering, I would probably be @ about +1.3 steps e.c for the eagle and want to be @ -0.3 for the otters because of the murky water. This changing of e.c. is pretty instinctive and I usually flip the wheel with my thumb as I move the camera. I seldom leave aperture priority and AutoISO when shooting wildlife. I have the shutter threshold set either to 1/the focal length or ~1/500 depending on what I think I will see. If I had a later body, I would usually use the auto threshold speed as that gives 1/fl. This isn't an option on the D700, though. I usually use AF-C with single-point and rear-button activation, and wouldn't change for any of these situations.



#11
austinkiker

austinkiker

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Country Flag
Do you stay at single focus point?
Nevermind i read through your post again and saw that, yes, you stay in a single focus point

#12
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,294 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

Do you stay at single focus point?

Usually, yes. There are situations where the follow-focus modes work well, but the single-point AF won't suddenly decide that something in the background looks more like what I locked focus on, jump away from the subject and lock on something different than what I intended. When I have used D4 and D810 bodies, I have used the multi-point modes much more as they are much more refined than the old AF system in my equally old bodies.



#13
austinkiker

austinkiker

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Country Flag
How does your depth of field turn out on single focus? If I have 3 subjects in my viewfinder, as with the otter photo, will single focus be able to lock onto all three subjects that are in varying degrees of depth?

Of course I will experiment and find out what works best for me but I am all about picking others brains and gaining knowledge as much as possible. Thank you so much for your insight and time.

#14
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,294 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

The AF doesn't take DOF into account. You have to decide yourself where you want the focus plane. The DOF is dependent on the chosen aperture. With practice, you can judge the approximate DOF by closing down the aperture with the DOF preview button. This is easier with the better finders found in the D7xxx upwards bodies but it is doable with the D5xxx series as well. It gets easier to get a predictable DOF the more you use your camera and lens as you learn to visualize what the DOF will be without stopping down to check.



#15
Wayben

Wayben

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationIowa

Site Supporter

I would still use AF-C and single point, then adjust aperture for DOF.  I'm pretty much guessing a the right aperture, but I like me guessing rather than the camera.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: d5300, autofocus