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Horse Photography

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4 replies to this topic

#1
Nikon16

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These are some of the photos I took with the Nikon D7100 I got like two weeks ago. What do you guys think?

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSC_2073 (2).jpg
  • DSC_2077 (2).jpg
  • DSC_2043 (2).jpg
  • DSC_2034.jpg
  • DSC_1460.jpg


#2
Merco_61

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Nice captures, except for one thing that is a pet peeve of mine. Things and animals that move need a composition that gives them space to move into, otherwise the photo looks a little cramped. Composing that way gives the added advantage of visual tension compared to a centered composition.



#3
Ron

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I find the fact that you've cut off the rider's head in image number four troubling. I realize that your interest is in the horse but casual viewers can't be expected to automatically know that. They will likely judge the picture as a whole and many people find cut off heads creepy. If you cropped the image at about the rider's waist (just below the power lines) I think it would work better. However, Peter is right about needing some space ahead of the direction of movement. 

 

I personally like numbers one and five the best. Numbers two and three are a bit too soft and there are problems with the background. The first four could also use a bit more contrast. However, they're a nice set of photos overall.

 

--Ron



#4
Nikon Shooter

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The DRL of these captures seems to have been completely overlooked!

The whites are blown, the mid-tones are not tamed and so impairing any

micro-contrast and micro-saturation.

 

I understand the idea of allowing more space in front of a moving subject

but it is a matter of speed. Here, the horse in the first three is not moving

fast so I think the frames are quite receivable.

 

A quick tweak suggestion…

 

Horse%20Photography.jpg



#5
TBonz

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I agree with Ron about image 4 - even if you were trying to get the horse, you really didn't get its face so that one is a no for me.  The first three look a bit soft and I agree with Peter on moving the subject off center when it is moving...even a very slight difference between front feet and back feet can make a big difference in the perception of the image.  What shutter speed were you shooting?  

 

I probably would have move the horse in image 5 so that it was looking into rather than out of the image, but excellent exposure with or without that change.


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