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Which lenses with D610?

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10 replies to this topic

#1
Natascia Sini

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Hi all! I am new in the forum. I am considering to buy my first Nikon, D610, and I was wondering if you can help me with the lenses. Which one could be a good lens considering I work mostly with portraits, buildings and weddings?

Thanks a lot! N.

 



#2
Dogbytes

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I've had a D610 for a couple of years now, it's a great camera. Actually it is a GREAT camera but as Nikon's entry level FF camera it's probably doomed to obscurity in the grand scheme of things. It produces extremely good images, in pretty much any situation, for very little money.

 

My most used lens is a 50mm. I started with an AF 50/1.8D and now I have an  AF-S 50/1.4 G which is far better than it is reported to be. I also have an AF 24/2.8 D which is very nice and doesn't need to be any faster because of the low shutter speeds at which it can be hand-held. The last permanent lens in my outfit is an AF 85/1.8 D which is a brilliant portrait lens. I'm sure the 1.4G is better but it is also vastly more expensive and I can't afford one!

 

If i had to pick just one (which is all I had when I first got the camera) it would be a 50mm.

 

I tend to buy extra lenses, if I see them at a good price, and then sell them after a while. Currently I have an AF 300/4 which is so lovely that I might even keep it!

 

This is a pic from a friend's wedding, taken with the 24mm due to lack of space...

The Look


#3
Merco_61

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What have you used before? What is your style of portraiture, architectural photography and weddings? Do you prefer zooms or primes? What is the lens budget? What is more important to you, sharpness and contrast or the quality of the background blur?

 

Without knowing these factors, all we can do is present our own choices, which will probably not be exactly your needs.



#4
Ron

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Let's see... portraits, buildings, and weddings. That's a pretty broad spectrum. I can also offer suggestions but what suits me may not suit you.

 

For buildings you're probably going to want something wide. But, will you be doing architectural photography where every line has to be perfectly straight or will you be doing more pictorial work? It makes a difference (in technique as well as optics).

 

For portraits and weddings you're probably going to want lenses in the normal (50mm) to short or medium telephoto (85mm-135mm) range. And, of course you can also use wide angle lenses for environmental portraits and on those occasions where your normal or tele lenses just can't take in the entire scene. Think of the inside of a large cathedral. You're also probably going to want fast lenses which means either spending big money on large aperture zooms or spending less but still considerable money on fast primes.

 

As Peter said, it's really difficult to choose lenses for someone based on such a broad spectrum. Only you know what type of 'look' you prefer. Some people like a telephoto look and conversely shoot just about every picture with a tele lens. Others like the expansive coverage and perspective of wide angles. There a number of other variables as well... do you mind changing lenses? Or would you prefer to shoot with just one or two zoom lenses?

 

If you tell us a bit more about where your interests lie and what you hope to accomplish, we can probably be more specific in our recommendations.

 

--Ron

 



#5
Merco_61

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My own choices for the three basic categories would be:

  • Portraits: 50/1.4G or 58/1.4 for portraits of couples, a 105, either the f/2 DC or the new 1.4 for classic portraits.
  • Architecture: 14-24/2.8 and 35/1.8.
  • Weddings: the above mentioned + a 24-70/2.8 and a 70-200/2.8.

If you shoot for personal use rather than professionally, the 24-120 as a walkaround zoom and a 20/1.8, 50/1.8G and 85/1.8G for low-light, portraits and architecture make a sensible set.



#6
Natascia Sini

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Hi All,

 

many thanks for your answers! You are right, I am sorry I didn't give a lot of information about my personal use.

 

I started taking pictures with a old Sony DSC- F828 and I loved it! I would like to improve my skills and try to use my pictures in a professional way. Yes, I am absolutely a beginner! I have been told Nikon D610 is a good camera to start with? I shot in a few friends' weddings and I would like to continue working in this field. I love details. I love freezing the moment, especially when people don't know I am there to capture their expression. I like sharpness and blurred background.

My budget is 1.700-1.900,00 $. My idea is to have one good lens to start with and buy a second one as soon as I can, rather than having two lenses with low quality ( I found good deals in this case) from the beginning.  What do you think?

 

I know I am more sentimental than specialist at the moment :) I am happy to hear from you guys, and learn from your experience and knowledge. 

 

Thanks in advance for your help!



#7
Merco_61

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Does that budget include the body?

 

In your position, I would go for a good walkaround zoom lens first as you come from a good bridge camera. The 24-85 is tremendous value for the money it costs. The 24-120 or a Sigma 24-105 are both a step up in quality, but it is not a large step. A 50/1.8 is cheap enough that you can probably get one from the start to have something with a short depth of field from the beginning. It is wise to hold off on getting more gear after that as you will have to find your own style by shooting as much as you can and evaluate what you shoot.



#8
Natascia Sini

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Yes, it includes the body.

 

Thank you Peter, I will definitely have a look!

 

Natascia



#9
Ron

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In the old days (don't ask! :rolleyes:) cameras came with prime lenses in the 50mm range and the prevalent attitude was to become comfortable using that lens before buying anything else. Many years have passed but I still think that's pretty good advice. Fifty millimeter lenses on full frame cameras are good for general photography and 50mm Nikkors are known for their high sharpness and pleasing bokeh (that is, how they render the out of focus elements in a photograph).

 

I believe that too many people become seduced by the convenience of zoom lenses and don't really take the time to study the finer points of framing and composition. A prime lens, on the other hand, forces the user to deal with those things. 

 

However, I fully understand the allure of zoom lenses. The zooms that Peter mentioned are all good and will produce excellent photographs. The AF-S Nikkor 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR in particular is a great match for the D610 although it doesn't have a constant aperture and isn't particularly fast. In it's favor, it's sharp and relatively inexpensive. In fact, I believe it's the kit lens that Nikon sells with the D610. I don't know what this combination would cost where you live, Natascia, but here in the states this kit can be had for just under US$2000. If you don't want to start with prime lenses, I think this is where I would start.

 

--Ron



#10
Dogbytes

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I have a D610 and it is an excellent camera. It is as simple or as complex to use as you choose and is capable of superb results. It also has the advantage of an in-body focussing motor so it can be used with older, and cheaper, Nikon lenses.

 

As a couple of other people have suggested, I would (actually, I did) start with a 50mm f1.8 - The 50/1.8D is cheaper than the AF-S version and actually focusses slightly faster. I buy most of my equipment from eBay and it's worked out pretty well up to now.

 

I have the D610 a 24/2.8, 50/1.4 and 85/1.8. I got them all used and from reputable Ebay sellers and from memory I think the body was £750, and the lenses around £225 each - so £1425, not far off your budget.



#11
leighgion

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Hi All,

 

many thanks for your answers! You are right, I am sorry I didn't give a lot of information about my personal use.

 

I started taking pictures with a old Sony DSC- F828 and I loved it! I would like to improve my skills and try to use my pictures in a professional way. Yes, I am absolutely a beginner! I have been told Nikon D610 is a good camera to start with? I shot in a few friends' weddings and I would like to continue working in this field. I love details. I love freezing the moment, especially when people don't know I am there to capture their expression. I like sharpness and blurred background.

My budget is 1.700-1.900,00 $. My idea is to have one good lens to start with and buy a second one as soon as I can, rather than having two lenses with low quality ( I found good deals in this case) from the beginning.  What do you think?

 

I know I am more sentimental than specialist at the moment :) I am happy to hear from you guys, and learn from your experience and knowledge. 

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

 

 

If freezing the moment, sharpness and shallow depth of field (blurred background) are your priorities, then I'll throw my recommendation behind a 50mm f/1.8. It's not going to do everything you want in every situation and is definitely not the first lens that comes to mind for a wedding, but it brings light gathering power, depth of field control and sharpness at a very affordable price. 

 

These days most all of my photography is of my 2-year-old, and I use my 50mm around 80% of the time on my D700. Photographing a toddler presents some of the same challenges as wedding photography, and probably has a lot less of your subjects charging the camera.  :lol:







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