Jump to content

Welcome to NikonForums.com
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Composition

technique composition

  • Please log in to reply
39 replies to this topic

#1
iNYONi

iNYONi

    Rob

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationLivingston, Scotland

Site Supporter

It's one of the most basic elements of any art, getting it right will change the way your photograph will look and feel. However, I know that this is a factor that I sometimes forget to think about when i'm rushing to take the shot. taking that extra couple of seconds to think about the shot can transform the final result from looking like a holiday snap to something worth putting on my website. (Pentax Forums - The Ultimate Resource for Everything Pentax)

 

I've been trying to take still life pictures and abstract shots however i struggle with setting the shots up and getting the props to look good. I just cant seem to get the composition right.

 

If any of you old Pro's out there could help, I would love some helpful hints and tips.

 

Also any thoughts or tips on getting composition right in every shot?



#2
MikeSudomaPhoto

MikeSudomaPhoto

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Country Flag

Im not old or pro by any means, but when I capture still life try and make your image tell a story. Capture your still life from interesting angles to keep the composition interesting. Remember you don't always have to get everything in the shot (e.g. full buildings, trees, etc) Try to communicate what the subjects in the scene are doing, where the shot is and how you feel about the subject through your image.  I hope this helps seeing as I am not that great at explaining myself at times, Especially in the morning :P

 

 

 

Not currrently updated but here are some examples of some of my still life work. Hope this helps



#3
PrettyCranium

PrettyCranium

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 410 posts
  • Country Flag

Are there any guides to photo composition, for newbies like myself?



#4
iNYONi

iNYONi

    Rob

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationLivingston, Scotland

Site Supporter

Some great shots there MikeSudomaPhoto, I love the different angles that you've taken the shots.

That's a good tip, I would really like to do some product shots, maybe try different lighting. 

 

Thanks



#5
MikeSudomaPhoto

MikeSudomaPhoto

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Country Flag

Some great shots there MikeSudomaPhoto, I love the different angles that you've taken the shots.

That's a good tip, I would really like to do some product shots, maybe try different lighting. 

 

Thanks

Thanks iNyoni, Product shots are fun. Off camera lighting is a must though, (thank god for CLS) if you want to create an attractive image of a product. What gear are you using?


Are there any guides to photo composition, for newbies like myself?

Hi PrettyCranium,

 

Just look through your view finder and take photos from a perspective that YOU find interesting. However I do have a couple of rules I follow. 1) Don't have a lot of dead or empty space in your image (e.g. too much sky, lots of head room when taking a portrait) 2) use objects in the foreground and background to create depth and height. That is what I am mainly thinking when I'm out shooting. Take photos of the same object from different vantage points. When you pick your final image that you think is the best ask, ask yourself why you think it's the best.  That's the best advice I can give you from a paid photographers point of view. I hope you find it to be useful to you :)  I'd love to see your end results



#6
scoobymax

scoobymax

    Senior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationDunstable, UK

Site Supporter

I agree MikeSudomaPhoto, empty space tends to draw the viewers eye away from the main focus or point of the image to much, try to find some leading lines in your image to draw people into the picture and make them feel they are there in the picture. You've got some great pictures there to!

#7
MikeSudomaPhoto

MikeSudomaPhoto

    Junior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Country Flag

I agree MikeSudomaPhoto, empty space tends to draw the viewers eye away from the main focus or point of the image to much, try to find some leading lines in your image to draw people into the picture and make them feel they are there in the picture. You've got some great pictures there to!

Thanks Scoobs, I agree with you fully on leading lines! It's awesome when theres a person or something interesting that the lines lead unto.   It rewards the eyes a little bit.



#8
K-9

K-9

    Jamie

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 883 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNew England

Site Supporter

It's hard to say this will help at all, but I've found that composition is almost a talent in that some are just good at it and others might not be.  It's hard to explain, but when I pick up the camera to my eye, I seem know exactly how to frame any given subject.  Lighting also plays a huge part in composition, and you may need to move either the framing or you and your camera to where the light looks best.  If you can control the lighting, moving or adjusting it's output can alter the composition.  If something isn't well lit, it doesn't matter how well it's positioned in the frame.

 

Make sure you have a subject in every composition.  The subject is usually what someone's eye will go to first.  If you shoot a fish and the viewer's eye immediately goes to a blue rock behind the fish, you haven't framed or composed the fish photo correctly.  Move the rock, or move to an angle where the blue rock doesn't draw the eye away from the fish, but maybe compliments it.

 

Avoid cluttered backgrounds or objects in the background that may touch or impose on the subject and make it look awkward.  Especially avoid linear objects in the backgrounds that can run into or through your subjects.



#9
scoobymax

scoobymax

    Senior Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationDunstable, UK

Site Supporter

Totally agree K-9, I myself have taken many shots on location and when I've got home and reviewed them on a big screen, thought oh! If only that tree wasn't there! Or if only I'd moved to that position, and of course by the time you get home it's too late!

#10
iNYONi

iNYONi

    Rob

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationLivingston, Scotland

Site Supporter

Some fantastic tips being posted here.

 

I found this little article on the rule of thirds

http://digital-photo.../rule-of-thirds

 

The D7100 allows you to include a gride on the view finder, I found this has helped me when trying to line up my shot.



#11
K-9

K-9

    Jamie

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 883 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNew England

Site Supporter

Totally agree K-9, I myself have taken many shots on location and when I've got home and reviewed them on a big screen, thought oh! If only that tree wasn't there! Or if only I'd moved to that position, and of course by the time you get home it's too late!


Yes, you definitely learn from ruined shots. Your eye then becomes trained to scan all areas of the frame, especially the background, before you press that shutter.

#12
Stas

Stas

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 436 posts
  • Country Flag

http://www.photograp...mposition-rules

 

Here is link for a good article about composition. Of course there are much rooles, but i think it is a base.



#13
rocknrumble

rocknrumble

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 450 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationSydney, Australia

Wow some really good points. I think creating depth helps as well, balancing the foreground with the background. If there is subject I like it leading into the photo rather than out. The rule of thirds is also a simple but handy guide for beginners as well. As other said, avoid cluttering the photo. A noisy background can ruin a great shot. Playing with your depth of field as well can help with that.

 

The best way is to go out and shot lots of photos and see what you like, then ask your friends what they like. It's digital so it doesn't cost anything other than your time and if you enjoy your photography it's no waste. The best way to get good anything is to do lots of it. Good luck.



#14
Stas

Stas

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 436 posts
  • Country Flag

When I was trying to answer to the one topic of this forum I found a very good article about perspective)

Here it is http://photo.tutsplu...to-your-photos/



#15
Stas

Stas

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 436 posts
  • Country Flag

Wow! A very good sight with interesting articles. I also recommend you to try to read this http://photo.tutsplu...ut-composition/

 

I think I will take few ideas from here to improve my photography)



#16
iNYONi

iNYONi

    Rob

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,112 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationLivingston, Scotland

Site Supporter

Great articles there, thanks for the posts. will be checking out thearticles later.



#17
PrettyCranium

PrettyCranium

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 410 posts
  • Country Flag
Thanks for the links!

#18
Stas

Stas

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 436 posts
  • Country Flag

I'm happy that you like this articles. If I will something else I will post a link here)



#19
rocknrumble

rocknrumble

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 450 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationSydney, Australia

Really enjoying the links to all the articles.



#20
nbanjogal

nbanjogal

    Nikonian

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,094 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUT, USA

Site Supporter

Composition is something I constantly have to work on, so I appreciate all the advice and links here.

One of the best photography books I own is Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Composition Field Guide." It is clearly and concisely written with wonderful photos to illustrate his points (shows the good and the bad). I'm reading it for the second time and plan to read it a third. With lots of practice on the points he makes, of course.

I've also learned a lot from watching Scott Kelby and Matt Kloskowski (sp?) doing blind critiques on "The Grid" (free online on Kelbytv.com).





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: technique, composition