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Astrophotography

astrophotography

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11 replies to this topic

#1
iNYONi

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Not sure if anyone else has raised this as a topic on here. Along with the 2 lenses I want to get (either the Nikon 200-500 or the Sigma 150-600 and the Tamron 15-30) I've been toying with the idea of getting myself a telescope, both for normal viewing and for attaching my camera to.

 

I've seen a Skywatcher Explorer 150P EQ3 Synscan GoTo (Telescope with Tripod) for £648.

 

A) Is this a good deal? How much would an adapter cost to allow the D750 to be attached?

 

B) Am I better getting a tracking mount for my existing tripod and using that (although as I understand it, this would only really give me shots of the sky and such with my existing lenses , 50mm and 58mm.

 

Anyone into this type of photography? if so and advice and suggestions?

 

Thanks

Rob



#2
morticiaskeeper

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Go for a scope and adaptor, unless you're going to spend a fortune on lenses and mounts, the scope will be the better bet.

My Nikon to scope adaptor cost about 20GBP.

Bear in mind that the majority of astrophotography pictures that you see are composites of a number of frames from a video recording. Registax is the software that most people use. Various techniques of processing allow you to reduce noise and increase light.

I've been using a Raspberry Pi with a 5mp camera, stacking about 400 frames to get a basic shot of Jupiter. For moon shots, I've been using a D80. Now that I've got a D7000, I will probably use that for video from now on.

#3
RossCumming

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Hi Rob, how serious are you about astrophotography? I could put you in touch with one of my mates from SDCC who has his own motorised telescope in his back garden to which he attaches a (canon) SLR to. He is a member of Stirling Astro Society. He is also on the Forth Valley Network (facebook group I linked you to) so you could buzz him through that if you wanted...

Here is a link to some of his older images - Stirling Astronomical Society

 

I am sure he would be happy to give you some pointers to start with - he is always very helpful and particularly so if it is about astrophotography (he has a Phd in astronomy!)



#4
bani12

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Go for a scope and adaptor, unless you're going to spend a fortune on lenses and mounts, the scope will be the better bet.

My Nikon to scope adaptor cost about 20GBP.

Bear in mind that the majority of astrophotography pictures that you see are composites of a number of frames from a video recording. Registax is the software that most people use. Various techniques of processing allow you to reduce noise and increase light.

I've been using a Raspberry Pi with a 5mp camera, stacking about 400 frames to get a basic shot of Jupiter. For moon shots, I've been using a D80. Now that I've got a D7000, I will probably use that for video from now on.

 

Hi, morticiaskeeper!

 

I am interested in astrophotography myself. I have been looking at scopes, too. I was wondering, do you attach a scope to a (equatorial or any other) mount?



#5
morticiaskeeper

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My scope came with an eq mount. I've got a Skywatcher 1145p with the eq1 mount. I've added a motor to help keep track.

The Raspberry Pi camera has given me the best results, but I still haven't had a chance to put the D7000 to work yet, although I have checked to see it fits and focuses.

If you are using a standard eq mount, adding a dslr will affect the balance a bit. You will probably have to move the weights outwards, or add a bit more weight to get it nicely balanced. It's difficult to explain how to balance, suffice to say that you'll know when it's right, like a rear view mirror in your car, once it's set, nothing else feels right.

Jupiter is in a good position at the moment.

#6
bani12

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Thanks for the quick reply! This sounds like a good bargain. What are the differences in mounts, if you don't mind me asking?

Do you have any images taken with your scope to share with us :) ?



#7
morticiaskeeper

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The bigger the mount, the better. My eq1 is a bit small and wobbly, very obvious when looking through the scope.  If I had a permanent viewing spot, I would build a concrete pedestal.  My tripod is much too wobbly, but it's portable.

 

An eq mount must be setup correctly so that it will track the stars properly. I usually setup on the driveway outside my front door, so I instinctively know which way north is.

 

The only pics I could find:

 

16214914024_95f4e83ac1_o.jpgJupiter by morticiaskeeper | Flickr, on Flickr

 

This was taken on a Raspberry Pi, then the 400 or so still frames were processed in Registax.  My first attempt at processing.

 

11909348945_7980f9fd2a_o.jpgTesting the big lens by morticiaskeeper | Flickr, on Flickr

 

D80 600mm Soligor prime, handheld



#8
iNYONi

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Hi Rob, how serious are you about astrophotography? I could put you in touch with one of my mates from SDCC who has his own motorised telescope in his back garden to which he attaches a (canon) SLR to. He is a member of Stirling Astro Society. He is also on the Forth Valley Network (facebook group I linked you to) so you could buzz him through that if you wanted...

Here is a link to some of his older images - Stirling Astronomical Society

 

I am sure he would be happy to give you some pointers to start with - he is always very helpful and particularly so if it is about astrophotography (he has a Phd in astronomy!)

Thanks Ross, yes that would be great. I'm quite interested in getting a scope but just dont know where to begin, getting some advice from your mate would be great and probably very useful in deciding what kit I should get.



#9
Ray Bunyan

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Your need a good tracking mount to do Astrophotograhy, i had a Skywatcher Star Adventurer with a Canon 600d (modified filters removed) and a 100mm F2 lens it showed about 1/2 million stars with a 5 minute exposure, good for what it does but deep space requires a decent Mount (£1200) and good Telescope i used a 10" reflector a CCD Camera (£1500) a few other odds and ends and your get Galaxies that are hidden for normal telescopes with 10 minute exposures, not a cheap hobby and take into account no pictures in the summer months its to light, no pictures with the Moon in the sky and no pictures if there's a breeze blowing unless you have a Dome Observatory ( £6000'ish), download Stellarium for a night sky map its free and i used it to drive my Telescope at the click of a button...



#10
marat stepanoff

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 it showed about 1/2 million stars with a 5 minute exposure...

Breathtakingly. Why do not you show your photos here? It is very interesting.



#11
Ray Bunyan

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I packed up the Astronomy several years but have a few on the present PC, Astro had its own PC which is residing in the Loft, so a picture NGC 1273 take with the full set-up 20 minute guided exposure with a ATIK CCD, 10" reflector Telescope, 80mm Guide Scope with Starlight Xpress Lodestar guide CCD, mounted on a Skywatcher NEQ6 Pro, plus other bits and pieces. hope i have loaded a picture...The little fuzzy bits are distant galaxies.

ngc1273 1200 414ex
 
M33 10 minute exposure same kit as above.....
 
M33 414ex 600

 



#12
Longviewer

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Your dSLR (and a similar balancing weight) will weigh quite a bit more than a typical eyepiece, so ensure the mount is strong enough to hold the extra weight and run the clock drive. I figure my little Oly Pen will serve well enough once my 'scope is mounted on a platform drive, and I will need fewer counterweights at the other end.





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