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D3200 and Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AF-D compatibility

d3200 50mm af-d compatibility

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#1
AlexF3HP

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I have a student with a D3200 and he just bought a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AF-D on Amazon. He realizes AF will not work with his camera, but when he turns on the camera, he gets a warning that the lens must be stopped down and locked to f/22. This doesn't fix the error message and the lens won't work with the camera.

 

I put the lens on a Nikon D200 and it worked fine (including AF). I also used the depth-of-field preview button and the aperture does work with all f/stops. I also tried a different AF-D lens stopped down and locked at f/22 on his D3200 and it got the same message, so the problem seems to be the D3200.

 

He's currently on firmware C 1.01 and L 1.009. I told him to update his firmware to the latest C 1.04 and L 2.013 as this is the only thing I could think that would be causing the problem. I also cleaned both contacts on the lens and camera with 70% rubbing alcohol, but both his camera and lens are extremely clean. 

 

If his firmware update doesn't help, any other suggestions other than returning the lens and getting a G instead?



#2
Merco_61

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You could try a factory reset, it probably won't help but it can't hurt either... On the D3200 you have to do the resets both in the shooting menu and in the setup menu as it doesn't have the usual reset buttons of the more expensive bodies. 

 

Try twisting the aperture ring back and forward a few times to see if it seats better. Getting rid of all oxides with only alcohol can be difficult as well, DeOxit does a much better job.



#3
AlexF3HP

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You could try a factory reset, it probably won't help but it can't hurt either... On the D3200 you have to do the resets both in the shooting menu and in the setup menu as it doesn't have the usual reset buttons of the more expensive bodies. 

 

Try twisting the aperture ring back and forward a few times to see if it seats better. Getting rid of all oxides with only alcohol can be difficult as well, DeOxit does a much better job.

Thanks Peter! I will pass this onto the student and report what, if anything, works. 

 

I did try twisting the aperture ring back and forth and the error message would go away briefly when the lens was locked at f/22 but with tension on the lens towards f/16. I think that was just the lens losing contact and thus the error message turned off. 

 

Haven't tried DeOxit but will pick some up. I live in a high humidity environment, so there is always a battle with oxidation.



#4
Jerry_

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Alex, with the f22 setting you are moving a small lever on the camera - this is needed for the camera to meter properly, while setting the aperture automatically.

What strikes me in your recent description is the "tension on the lens towards f/16" and I guess that this is the problem (as the lens is no longer correctly set to f/22, for it to work)

Therefore check what causes this tension.

As mentioned in your original post, you had the same problem with another lens, so the problem is likely on the camerabody. Check if all elements are properly in place and nothing is torn.

#5
AlexF3HP

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Alex, with the f22 setting you are moving a small lever on the camera - this is needed for the camera to meter properly, while setting the aperture automatically.

What strikes me in your recent description is the "tension on the lens towards f/16" and I guess that this is the problem (as the lens is no longer correctly set to f/22, for it to work)

Therefore check what causes this tension.

As mentioned in your original post, you had the same problem with another lens, so the problem is likely on the camerabody. Check if all elements are properly in place and nothing is torn.

Thanks Jerry.

Sorry, I probably didn't describe this well enough. With the lens mounted and locked at f/22, there is very small amount of 'wiggle' room if I torque the lens toward f/16. Maybe .5mm? That amount of slack may be normal. I just was playing with the lens and aperture ring to see if anything would get the camera to recognize f/22. The tension is from me, but yes, I will check his lens mount in case there's a screw loose.



#6
Kenafein

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Does this occur when it's put into manual mode?  I think it only supports a few modes when use glass without a motor.  



#7
AlexF3HP

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Does this occur when it's put into manual mode?  I think it only supports a few modes when use glass without a motor.  

Yes, it does occur in Manual mode. I also tried A(perture priority) mode, and it still doesn't get past the warning about setting the lens to minimum aperture (f/22). I haven't tried the other modes. The student did update his firmware and reports it didn't fix the issue.


You could try a factory reset, it probably won't help but it can't hurt either... On the D3200 you have to do the resets both in the shooting menu and in the setup menu as it doesn't have the usual reset buttons of the more expensive bodies. 

The student reports that he did both factory resets ("reset settings") and the issue remains. One thing I love about teaching photography is that my students are constantly bringing me new problems I've never seen before. Can't wait to figure this one out.



#8
AlexF3HP

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Okay, just found this thread:

 

Mounting older AF lenses on a D3200 | Photo.net Photography Forums

 

Will try it if it doesn't seem I'll be harming anything. I am not a fan of entry-level Nikons, so I'm guessing they weren't trying too hard to design the D3200 to work reliably with AF-D lenses. If anyone reads the linked thread, can you think of any reason why this could harm the camera?



#9
Kenafein

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Too late to return it for the G?  The 35/1.8G is probably a more useful lens on the camera, and it's only about $70 more.  The 50 1.8G is only a little more than that.  I know students have to watch every penny, but AF would be nice to have.  I have never owned an entry model Nikon.  I've helped a few friends with theirs, but they are a pain.  



#10
AlexF3HP

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Too late to return it for the G?  The 35/1.8G is probably a more useful lens on the camera, and it's only about $70 more.  The 50 1.8G is only a little more than that.  I know students have to watch every penny, but AF would be nice to have.  I have never owned an entry model Nikon.  I've helped a few friends with theirs, but they are a pain.  

IDK if it's too late for him to return the AF-D...probably not. You're right the 35/1.8G makes more sense for an APS-C sensor, but the 50mm is a good investment if and when he upgrades to FF. I love the 50mm/1.4G, but the 1.8G can't be beat on price.

 

I have to admit that the only entry level Nikon was my an N2000 FSLR. I bought that as a third body to go with two F3HP back in my Hollywood days as a Unit and Special Stills Photographer. Shooting on film sets, I'd use a Jacobson sound blimp to silence the camera, but couldn't afford and didn't want to carry all my F3's with an MD4 motordrive....so I got the small, plastic, and lightweight N2000. At the time the N2000 was probably 1/5 the cost of a F3 and the salesman warned me it was cheaply made and wouldn't handle professional use. That was 30 years ago and both of my F3's have been in for repairs, but the N2000 never did and still works like new.

 

My Fujifilm S1 and S2 have died long ago, but my D100, D200, and D50 are still working great as temporary loaners for students. Imagine having a DSLR working 30 years after purchase!



#11
AlexF3HP

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Just want to thank everyone for their input on this puzzle.

 

As it turns out, the link to the post on #8 from photo.net turned out to be the solution from the OP. There is a small tab/button on the D3200 that needs to be physically depressed because the AF-D part doesn't quite engage it as it should. The student followed the suggestion and reports his D3200 and Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D work are now functioning albeit no AF as the D3200 needs a G lens. 



#12
Kenafein

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My Fujifilm S1 and S2 have died long ago, but my D100, D200, and D50 are still working great as temporary loaners for students. Imagine having a DSLR working 30 years after purchase!

 

My friend had a 10 year old, at the time he finally sold it, DSLR.  It still worked, but you certainly wouldn't want to use it.  



#13
AlexF3HP

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My friend had a 10 year old, at the time he finally sold it, DSLR.  It still worked, but you certainly wouldn't want to use it.  

I agree that once you start shooting with a better AF and better sensor camera, it's very hard to accept an older model. But I once led a photo safari with a dozen students and 3 chaperones for 3 days on Molokai. A colleague didn't want to use his point-and-shoot, so I loaned him my old (2005) Nikon D50 (6MP) with a 35mm f/1.8G.

 

At the end of the trip, I asked everyone to please contribute their best images for inclusion in a photo book. There was a whole range of DSLRs used from 24MP FF to 16MP APS-C, but the best photos came from that D50. Reality check for me that it's the photographer, and to some degree the lens, that will make the biggest difference. To be fair, on that particular trip, we always had plenty of good light and never exceeded 400 ISO, and no, I wouldn't give up my D7100 for the D50.







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