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White Balancing Questions

white balance

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3 replies to this topic

#1
sam1971

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Hi, I just recently picked up a Godox QS400 for my studio. Previously I was using just speedlights for all my off camera flash portraits. I soon realised that leaving my camera settings on  "Flash" white balance gave less than accurate colour rendition. I decided to do the PRE Preset manual white balance from a photograph of a white sheet of paper.

 

My question is this, do I have to make a manual white balance every time I move the strobe into a different positions or can I just leave it on the one preset photo taken?. Also what if I change the light modifier to a different softbox or increase/decrease the strobe power?

 

I'd appeciate any help you experts can give me.

 

Much thanks,

 

Sam



#2
Merco_61

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First, try to find a white melitta filter rather than stationery as a white balance target as most copier or printer papers aren't quite neutral.

If your Godox holds it's colour temp with reduced output, you won't need to change the w/b in a studio setting. The same goes for modifiers. If they are neutral they won't affect the colour, but cheap or old modifiers tend to give a slight yellow cast.

 

I tend to use auto w/b, but shoot a colorchecker passport when I have changed something significantly in the setup. W/b then takes place as a part of my postprocessing. The auto w/b is good enough for the histograms to be usable in camera with the low-contrast preset I use for my raw files. As I use Adobe software that discards everything but w/b of the Nikon settings in the Nef files, this makes things easy for me.



#3
sam1971

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First, try to find a white melitta filter rather than stationery as a white balance target as most copier or printer papers aren't quite neutral.

If your Godox holds it's colour temp with reduced output, you won't need to change the w/b in a studio setting. The same goes for modifiers. If they are neutral they won't affect the colour, but cheap or old modifiers tend to give a slight yellow cast.

 

I tend to use auto w/b, but shoot a colorchecker passport when I have changed something significantly in the setup. W/b then takes place as a part of my postprocessing. The auto w/b is good enough for the histograms to be usable in camera with the low-contrast preset I use for my raw files. As I use Adobe software that discards everything but w/b of the Nikon settings in the Nef files, this makes things easy for me.

 

Hi Peter, Thanks for the reply. When you say try the Melitta filter do you mean those coffee filter thingies?. I'm a tea drinker so I'll have to go get some if thats the case.



#4
Merco_61

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Sam, yes I mean the coffee filters. A grey card is the best target, but a coffee filter works well and can be found in most parts of the world. Paper products for office use are nearly always coated with something to give better contrast when printed on.







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