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Jinbei DM3 Studio Strobes


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9 replies to this topic

#1
dcbear78

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Bought this kit after having it recommended to me. t'Is a Chinese brand making some in roads here in Australia at least. I was looking at an Elinchrom set which is obviously more well known. But I just couldn't go past the value of this set. To get the two strobes, stands, wireless trigger and 2 softboxes for this price meant I could afford to add the battery pack as I don't have a studio to work with so most of my shots are on location.

 

Also got a 22" white beauty dish with grid and sock from AliExpress (Alibaba) which was my first time getting something from there. I know they sell heaps of fake things, but it's a tin, powder coated dish. I really couldn't care less about authenticity.

 

http://www.protog.co...an/JBDM34002KIT

 

JBDM34002KIT.jpg

 

JBDM34002KIT.jpg JBDM34002KIT.jpg

 

 

Specs

 

Guide Number: 66
Recycle time 0.3s - 1.5s
Power adjustment: 6 stops, 1/1 to 1/32
Flash recycle notification: LED light, audible buzz, or LED modelling light illumination
Flash Duration t=0.5 1/2000s
Colour Temperature 5500K +/-200K
Trigger methods: Sync port, Infra Red, or built in 2.4GHz wireless
Trigger channels: 16
Flash Casing: Alumimium
Weight: 1.7kg per head. Kit Weight: 8.8kg
Dimensions: 124mm diameter x 216mm long

 

JBEN350.jpg

 

Now.... Just need to learn what I am doing with it all.



#2
Merco_61

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Seems like a good starter set, except that I can't get 400 J and a GN of 66 to match. A GN of 66 measured with a 55° reflector is about 63 with the industry standard 62°. This gives an output of 250 J. A 400 J unit has a GN of about 80.

This doesn't mean much as long as you only use these flashes, but can be a problem when mixing units from different makers. The power outputs of most cheap units are pure fantasy anyway. This lower power than advertised makes it more probable that the flash will work reliably without visible cooling. This would be a concern if it really was 400 J.

 

It is always a good exercise to measure the guide number in the configurations you will use the most and write them down as this makes it easier to get predictable results from the start. GN is just distance between flash and subject multiplied by the aperture tested at ISO 100.



#3
dcbear78

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Seems like a good starter set, except that I can't get 400 J and a GN of 66 to match. A GN of 66 measured with a 55° reflector is about 63 with the industry standard 62°. This gives an output of 250 J. A 400 J unit has a GN of about 80.

This doesn't mean much as long as you only use these flashes, but can be a problem when mixing units from different makers. The power outputs of most cheap units are pure fantasy anyway. This lower power than advertised makes it more probable that the flash will work reliably without visible cooling. This would be a concern if it really was 400 J.

 

It is always a good exercise to measure the guide number in the configurations you will use the most and write them down as this makes it easier to get predictable results from the start. GN is just distance between flash and subject multiplied by the aperture tested at ISO 100.

 

My totally unscientific testing (based on what you stated) with a light meter set on ISO 100, power set to one on flash (with 55° reflector) gave me a result of f8 when held approximately a metre away. So this would be your GN of 80 yeah?

 

New to all this and so don't understand any of it.



#4
Merco_61

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No, this is only a GN of 8, strange. Does the flash show power steps instead of reduction steps, so that power 1 is 1/32 of full power and power 6 is full dump? A GN of 66 should be f/6.6 at 10 m...



#5
dcbear78

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Wait... What exposure time do I set the light meter to?

#6
Merco_61

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Something short to ensure that the flash is close to 100% of the illumination. What light meter do you use?



#7
dcbear78

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The new sekonic one that looks like an iPhone.

#8
sam1971

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I have the Jinbei DM3 400 in my shortlist of strobes I'm looking to buy. Has anyone got any hands on experience with these strobes?.



#9
dcbear78

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I have the Jinbei DM3 400 in my shortlist of strobes I'm looking to buy. Has anyone got any hands on experience with these strobes?.

 

Sorry I missed this question.... Obviously I do have these (as i started the thread). I have used them fairly extensively since getting them. I couldn't imagine going back to speed lights now (although I have them on me at all times as they have their purposes). I have used Elinchrom strobes in the local studio i hire and these Jinbei ones are every bit as good as the ones I used. Build quality seems about the same. Similar power levels and controls. Certainly better ones would be better.

I mostly use them on location, so have the battery pack. Because of this I think I would prefer a couple of the Jinbei HD600's if budget stretched that far. Not only do they have the battery built in and no need for cables, but with a suitable trigger they are capable of HSS which the DM3's aren't. I am thinking about adding one to my DM3 kit and having a 3 light setup.

 

As for some examples....

Single strobe with gridded beauty dish

20862762382_3704698eb9_n.jpg

Emily by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

Peter Hurley style head shot and lighting. Two strobes. One with 2'x3' softbox on an angle and 4'x1' softbox to the right.

20665283972_48030ea708_n.jpg

IMRF Headshots by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

One strobe with included 55 degree reflector camera right. Speed light camera left. Shot during the day, so these are capable of putting out some light

20201524275_61203eaefb_n.jpg

Maddie by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

And again single strobe with 55 degree reflector (for portability more than anything)

19523132046_ac5ed78a32_n.jpg

Anelia by Crew One Photography, on Flickr



#10
sam1971

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Sorry I missed this question.... Obviously I do have these (as i started the thread). I have used them fairly extensively since getting them. I couldn't imagine going back to speed lights now (although I have them on me at all times as they have their purposes). I have used Elinchrom strobes in the local studio i hire and these Jinbei ones are every bit as good as the ones I used. Build quality seems about the same. Similar power levels and controls. Certainly better ones would be better.

I mostly use them on location, so have the battery pack. Because of this I think I would prefer a couple of the Jinbei HD600's if budget stretched that far. Not only do they have the battery built in and no need for cables, but with a suitable trigger they are capable of HSS which the DM3's aren't. I am thinking about adding one to my DM3 kit and having a 3 light setup.

 

As for some examples....

Single strobe with gridded beauty dish

20862762382_3704698eb9_n.jpg

Emily by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

Peter Hurley style head shot and lighting. Two strobes. One with 2'x3' softbox on an angle and 4'x1' softbox to the right.

20665283972_48030ea708_n.jpg

IMRF Headshots by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

One strobe with included 55 degree reflector camera right. Speed light camera left. Shot during the day, so these are capable of putting out some light

20201524275_61203eaefb_n.jpg

Maddie by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

And again single strobe with 55 degree reflector (for portability more than anything)

19523132046_ac5ed78a32_n.jpg

Anelia by Crew One Photography, on Flickr

 

Hi dcBear, thanks for your post. Great photo's by the way!. I decided to pull the trigger on the Godox QS-400 range as I remember you saying that the build quality would probably be better, which after some extensive research I found to be actually true. I haven't got the strobe yet but am quite confident that it will be very good for $300.