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stitching software


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14 replies to this topic

#1
OTRTexan

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Today I stopped in Colorado and made my first attempt at a panorama. I did some looking online and tried a couple of different programs. Microsoft ICE, which it's attempt was decent, it just didn't use all of the photos (4) I wanted in the pano. Then I tried Hugin. It used all the photos, but the pano was extremely slanted. There may be a way within the program to fix this, but before I spent time trying to learn a new program, I thought I'd pop on here and see what others use successfully. I'll attach the pano made with Hugin to show what I mean.

 

DSC_0579 - DSC_0582.jpg



#2
deano

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looks like Lake Dillon.



#3
Merco_61

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I use Photoshop, but I used to use Canon's PhotoStitch. I wrote a blog post on my approach to panoramas here.



#4
dcbear78

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Microsoft ICE is far and away the best, easiest and quickest. I do these quite often and have tried all options. None have worked as well.

#5
OTRTexan

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It is Lake Dillon. Using the same 4 pics, ice would l wa ve out the right mountain altogether. Perhaps I'm not doing something right.

#6
OTRTexan

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After reading your blog, I think I need more overlap. Something I'll have to experiment with.

#7
Merco_61

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More overlap gives the software a bit more to work with when aligning the files. This often gives a better end result.



#8
Ron

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I also use Photoshop for my panos. This one actually looks pretty nice except for the slant. 

 

--Ron



#9
Fogey

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It's my experience, when taking panos, is to set the lens to 50mm.  Anything wide angle will produce a curved or slanting pano.

 

I've found Serif's Panorama Plus very good - there is a free version, just Google it.



#10
Marcus Rowland

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Another vote for Serif. Tons of ads in the free version, but it works reasonably well, here's one I posted to Wikipedia, excavation of a Victorian railway shunting yard near my house:

 

Dig1_05.JPG

 

Hugin works reasonably well too, but it sometimes doesn't handle the transition between several images so well, e.g. you get a sudden change in tone or a discontinuity between two images.



#11
Merco_61

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I have a pair of multi-row panos up in this thread. They are made with a 105 and AutopanoGiga. 

 

I agree with Jeff about keeping away from wide-angle lenses if possible. If you need or want a larger vertical coverage, make another sweep rather than go with the wide-angle lens. The results will be much better.



#12
ScottinPollock

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Affinity Photo has been my go to app since its initial release. 1.5 brings amazing stacking abilities and a Windoze version.

 

A Photoshop killer for fifty bucks!



#13
4breezes

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I tried stitching five images together today.  It worked quite well.  I used MS ICE, for the first time.  I previously used Autostitch, a rather dated program.  ICE was much easier.  The image shows the upper area of Big Basin Redwood State Park, CA.  You can see the ocean in the distance.

 

DSC_0014_stitch.jpg



#14
Nikon Shooter

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I use PTGui for pano… never refused a frame

FlamPanorama2.jpg



#15
brotell1950

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i use photoshop elements 2019 and it dose a great job