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Moon photography using Teleconvertors

moon teleconvertor night

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8 replies to this topic

#1
Nasseh

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Hi guys,

 

Have you ever tried taking photos of Moon using  a Teleconvertor (and a lens of course) ? if so, what is your recommended setup for that ?  (specifically for a Nikon DX user)

 

Thanks



#2
LesM

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Hi Nasseh,

 

I've photographed the moon in the day time with a 70-200 f/2.8G and a TC-14E II 1.4X teleconverter on a D70 with no problems. The autofocus, VR and metering worked just fine with this setup. However, it does increase the effective minimum aperture to 4 on an f/2.8 lens. The field of view is a little more shaky though, so a solid tripod or faster shutter speeds are needed for sharpest results. So far, I've noticed very little loss in image quality, however, I usually shoot at f/5.6 or higher for added depth of field and to minimize any image degradation from the converter. I suspect a DX sensor probably helps mask some of the image degradation due to edge sharpness loss from using the converter, but have never compared it to a full frame.

 

Another thing I've noticed shooting the moon is that the moon usually ends up blown out and overexposed compared to foreground objects in the photo. I usually bracket to underexpose a few photos of the same composition, or select spot metering and expose for the moon. Later, you can clone in the moon from one of your underexposed images onto the image with proper foreground exposure to retain details in both the moon and foreground. However, it's best to use a light hand when doing this to avoid unreal looking images.

 

Les.



#3
TBonz

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Here's a link to a topic on night photography that includes some shots and settings suggestions - including shooting the moon...

 

Night photography - Photographic Technique - NikonForums.com



#4
Nasseh

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Hi Les,

 

Thank you for sharing your experience and valuable information.  So, you reached 200x1.4x1.5(crop factor) = 420mm right? was that enough or you finally cropped the picture?



#5
Nasseh

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Hi Sportz2Pix,

 

Thanks for the useful link.



#6
LesM

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Actually, it was just the 1.4X teleconverter with the 200mm, for 280mm effective mm. Doesn't sound like much, but it makes a significantly bigger impression of the moon in the composition versus not using the converter. I end up cropping most images at least a little to better isolate the subject and the contextual content and to balance them against each other.

 

If I did have a longer lens, I'd use it for more moon shots, but not all of them. A 300 or 400 would be pretty sweet too for moon/landscapes, IMHO. Anything much smaller than 200mm and I tend to loose the surface detail and prominence of the moon as the main subject, which in many cases is fine. But the 200 by itself (or with the 1.4X converter) has served well for the majority of the moon/landscape images I've shot and it's not to heavy off-trail backpacking.



#7
TBonz

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Hi Les,

 

Thank you for sharing your experience and valuable information.  So, you reached 200x1.4x1.5(crop factor) = 420mm right? was that enough or you finally cropped the picture?

 

LesM,

 

As I recall, the D70 has a cropped sensor, so Nasseh would be correct...you would be effectively shooting at 420 with that lens and a 1.4 TC on a D70...



#8
LesM

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Yep, you're totally right, 420mm effective. I've been shooting with a crop sensor so long I don't even consider the crop factor in my mind any more when handling lenses :-)



#9
TBonz

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Yup...I did the same before I got my first D600...







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: moon, teleconvertor, night