Jump to content

Welcome to NikonForums.com
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Odd film Processing


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
Tomwlkjr

Tomwlkjr

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNorth Carolina Coast

I have a couple rolls of film not sure where I got them. Processing is ECN II. Any suggestions on where to get it developed. Local lab says they caint do it.



#2
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,523 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

It is colour film for the movie industry. It has an extra protective layer that needs to be removed during the processing, which is why your local lab won't touch it. 

 

It also needs to be stored refrigerated, used quickly when loaded in a camera and developed soon after that. For long-term storage, the temp needs to be below -18°C.

 

Finding a lab that can handle short strips of this material is difficult as the labs that can do the process are set up for deep-tank developing of long rolls, or even roller-transported, fully automated processing. 



#3
Tomwlkjr

Tomwlkjr

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNorth Carolina Coast

It is colour film for the movie industry. It has an extra protective layer that needs to be removed during the processing, which is why your local lab won't touch it. 

 

It also needs to be stored refrigerated, used quickly when loaded in a camera and developed soon after that. For long-term storage, the temp needs to be below -18°C.

 

Finding a lab that can handle short strips of this material is difficult as the labs that can do the process are set up for deep-tank developing of long rolls, or even roller-transported, fully automated processing. 

Thanks, since I don't remember when and where I got it, I'll just toss it



#4
lightcapture

lightcapture

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 308 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNC

Why not try to see what's on it? Could be interesting and creative, plus enhanced w/ digital editing.



#5
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,523 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

Why not try to see what's on it? Could be interesting and creative, plus enhanced w/ digital editing.


The problem is that the lab needs to have a specialized waterjet scrubber to remove the extra protective layer before processing. Still photo labs do not have this equipment.

#6
tonyzoc

tonyzoc

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Country Flag
Film Photography Project has ECN developing kits.
https://filmphotogra...-1-liter-powder

Removing the remjet layer looks to be just a chemical rinse to remove ...


How do I remove "rem jet" layer from Kodak Vision 3 line of films with FPP's c-41 Kit?

If you're familiar with ECN-2 films then you know that it contains a black carbon base that needs to be removed. Most folks think you need a separate product to remove this rem jet. You don't. Use your thumb and save some cash!

When you're heating your chemistry, keep that bucket of water for your final wash. After your last step (fixer), rinse your film in your of hot water (80 - 102 degrees F). With your thumb, gently rub the non-emulsion side of your film as you remove it from your film reel. Careful not to scratch the emulsion of your film. Final rinse under running water before submerging your film into the two-minute Stabilizer. You will see the black rem jet in your water as you rinse.

That's it! Hang your film to dry and then scan! Enjoy!!!!



Sent from my Pixel 7 Pro using Tapatalk

#7
Tomwlkjr

Tomwlkjr

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationNorth Carolina Coast

Film Photography Project has ECN developing kits.
https://filmphotogra...-1-liter-powder

Removing the remjet layer looks to be just a chemical rinse to remove ...


How do I remove "rem jet" layer from Kodak Vision 3 line of films with FPP's c-41 Kit?

If you're familiar with ECN-2 films then you know that it contains a black carbon base that needs to be removed. Most folks think you need a separate product to remove this rem jet. You don't. Use your thumb and save some cash!

When you're heating your chemistry, keep that bucket of water for your final wash. After your last step (fixer), rinse your film in your of hot water (80 - 102 degrees F). With your thumb, gently rub the non-emulsion side of your film as you remove it from your film reel. Careful not to scratch the emulsion of your film. Final rinse under running water before submerging your film into the two-minute Stabilizer. You will see the black rem jet in your water as you rinse.

That's it! Hang your film to dry and then scan! Enjoy!!!!

That's fine if you process ypurself, I don't

Sent from my Pixel 7 Pro using Tapatalk



#8
tonyzoc

tonyzoc

    Active Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Country Flag
Atlanta Film Co. Sells ECN film and has processing services...
https://www.atlantaf...ta Film Company

Also Boutique Film Labs has packages with dev-print-scan options.
ECN-2 Film – Boutique Film Lab


Sent from my Pixel 7 Pro using Tapatalk