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How do I get a better video of Saturn?


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7 replies to this topic

#1
dragon49

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I'm reasonably these are pictures of Saturn, which is what I was aiming for.  These images were all extracted from 4K videos I took of a celestial body with my new P1000.  They were taken at the max 3000 mm zoom.  I'm not asking about focus issues.  I did my best to hold the camera steady.  The problem with the video is that the planet is too pure, intense white, as if I took a picture of an actual light that was shaped like Saturn and its rings.  I didn't do anything to tweak the video settings.  I just set video capture to be 30 FPS 4K.

Next time I go out to capture the 6th planet from the sun, what do I need to tweak to get a better video?  I took stills as well, but the extracted images came out better, as with a video, I can eventually get enough stabilization, that is harder when taking individual photos at max zoom.
 

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#2
dragon49

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Bump:

 

I was so excited to test the new camera with a planetary capture that I forgot about exposure compensation. :)  I assume in the future, I can simply adjust exposure compensation down before taking photos or videos of planets.

 

Pls let me know if there are any other tweaks I can apply.

If I didn't have to work later this morning, I'd go right back out there, but I do need a little sleep in order to solve problems. :)



#3
g4aaw pete

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Looks fairly convincing to me.

I'd recommend investing in a tripod.

 

For photos I'd use manual mode. Perhaps 1/200s / f8  ISO 200 as a starting point. Disclaimer - I haven't checked the manual to see if that's possible on your model.

 

Most annoying how work gets in the way. You should be able to pick up the phone & call the boss - 'Sorry I'll be in late today, as I need to photograph Saturn'. 



#4
Merco_61

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I would also recommend a tripod. 

This is a good, relatively cheap one.

 

To get better balance on the tripod a longer Arca-Swiss compatible plate works well.

https://www.bhphotov..._QR_Camera.html

 

This old thread from 2019 might be worth reading.



#5
Ron

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Yeah, that's Saturn... or a bug, or perhaps a UFO! :ph34r:

 

Like the others, I would invest in a good tripod and Arca Swiss QR system. If you choose carefully, and get a really good tripod, it can last a lifetime. And, if you decide to upgrade your camera, your tripod will still chug along, doing it's job.

 

Exposures can be really tricky with astro subjects. You have to remember that you're aiming to have the celestial object be correctly exposed. As they say, expose for the highlights, etc. Let the shadows... or empty space, fall where they may. 

 

The thread that Peter pointed to, is a good primer for this stuff. Well worth the read.

 

Good luck!

 

--Ron



#6
Merco_61

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Yeah, that's Saturn... or a bug, or perhaps a UFO! :ph34r:

 

Like the others, I would invest in a good tripod and Arca Swiss QR system. If you choose carefully, and get a really good tripod, it can last a lifetime. And, if you decide to upgrade your camera, your tripod will still chug along, doing it's job.

 

Exposures can be really tricky with astro subjects. You have to remember that you're aiming to have the celestial object be correctly exposed. As they say, expose for the highlights, etc. Let the shadows... or empty space, fall where they may. 

 

The thread that Peter pointed to, is a good primer for this stuff. Well worth the read.

 

Good luck!

 

--Ron

A tripod that lasts a lifetime is likely to be expensive. I can only think of three that fit that description. The Berlebach tripods are beautifully made from ash and can definitely outlive the owner by decades. The Sachtler ENG-2 looks a bit utilitarian, but the carbon layups kill all resonances. The third is the Cartoni ESP and is very similar to the Sachtler, but with Italian flair in the design rather than the utilitarian look of the Sachtler. All these use a 100mm halfbowl to mount either a video head or a gimbal head. 
Checking prices for these truly professional tripods will scare most ordinary  people, but it will put the quality for the price you get with Sirui or Vanguard tripods into perspective. These third-tier tripods are a wonderful value for the money.


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#7
Ron

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I am currently using a Sirui and have found it to be a pretty good compromise between quality and cost. With proper care, I see no reason why it couldn't last decades. But then I'm not trekking through the mountains and swamps in search of photo ops. I'm really not familiar with most of the others you mentioned so I'll take your word as to their superiority.

 

The main thing is, I think, to get a tripod that has a good balance between rigidity and portability. If it's too inconvenient to carry then it's going to be left home... which is worse than having no tripod at all. 

 

Tripods (and heads) are among the things that most serious photographers tend to go through a lot. I have an old no name tripod I bought nearly 50 years ago. I've torn it down and rebuilt it several times over the years. Why I don't toss it, I'll never know.... except that, maybe it's because it's made of aluminum and is very light while still being fairly rigid. Also, if something happens to it, well... I'm not going to cry over it. Not too much anyway. 

 

--Ron



#8
lightcapture

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I'm reasonably these are pictures of Saturn, which is what I was aiming for.  These images were all extracted from 4K videos I took of a celestial body with my new P1000.  They were taken at the max 3000 mm zoom.  I'm not asking about focus issues.  I did my best to hold the camera steady.  The problem with the video is that the planet is too pure, intense white, as if I took a picture of an actual light that was shaped like Saturn and its rings.  I didn't do anything to tweak the video settings.  I just set video capture to be 30 FPS 4K.

Next time I go out to capture the 6th planet from the sun, what do I need to tweak to get a better video?  I took stills as well, but the extracted images came out better, as with a video, I can eventually get enough stabilization, that is harder when taking individual photos at max zoom.
 

fwmh0zz.jpg
 
 

These guys are the best for anything Astronomical. Very helpful and responsive folks. Hopefully they can help you in your endeavor.

 

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