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Will film and film cameras experience a renaissance?

analogue cameras

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15 replies to this topic

#1
Keld Mikkelsen

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From the golden age of 35mm film SLR cameras, the 1970s, a fully mechanical camera of the highest possible quality. They are still working, taking pictures of the same high quality as then. Nikon's professional film SLR camera 1959-1973, the Nikon F. The model depicted is from 1970. It will probably still work 50 years from now, while today's digital cameras (even the most advanced) will long ago have been discarded as outdated technology. They already are after two or three years. Perhaps film production for 35mm cameras at that time has been resumed on a grand scale? The analogue film cameras might have a bright future! What do you think?

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  • _KMI0001-43 (2).jpg


#2
Merco_61

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The cameras will go on clicking, but getting colour film developed will probably get more and more difficult for environmental reasons (or excuses). Kodachrome is already gone and the bureaucracy for keeping an E6 lab going is getting worse each year, at least in the US and EU. C-41 isn’t too regulated yet, but will probably be next.



#3
dragon49

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The cameras will go on clicking, but getting colour film developed will probably get more and more difficult for environmental reasons (or excuses). Kodachrome is already gone and the bureaucracy for keeping an E6 lab going is getting worse each year, at least in the US and EU. C-41 isn’t too regulated yet, but will probably be next.

Tough stuff.  I have a 125 series Polaroid Land Camera, but nobody makes film for it anymore.  I contacted Polaroid and they replied:
 

Your camera appears to use peel-apart (pack film) which, unfortunately, is no longer being manufactured.
 
Our team does not have access to the necessary machinery as the old Polaroid had scrapped their pack film machinery in 2008.  There are no current plans for us to pursue the pack film format, instead we will be focused on producing our own film types such as the 600-series, i-Type, and SX-70 formats you can find on our website:  https://us.polaroid....ns/instant-film

Some company called The Impossible Project made some of this pack film, but they no longer do. Guys on Ebay are selling 35+ year expired film for disgusting prices that I'm going to pass on.

Killing me, as I'd love to honor my late grandfather, whom I inherited the camera from, by using it.  It also takes great pictures.  I don't remember one of the great features, maybe it was great low-light black and white photos.  Some great quality was achieved, I seem to remember from shutter speed.


#4
lightcapture

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I think it's unlikely to have a resurgence for the masses. Only possible in the niche art community.



#5
Brian

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My friend at work wants to start shooting film again. I'm giving her a user F3HP, 50/1.8 Series E lens.

 

Polaroid- you can buy 600 pack film at Walmart. 

 

Peel-Apart film, gone. I sold my top of the line model 180 before it was discontinued, $700. I still have some color peel-apart in the fridge, but used up all the B&W 3000 speed film in my O-Scope cameras. I converted my Model 250 to use AAA batteries.

 

I ended up shooting more with these...

 

52176897063_3eede68288_o.jpgBLACKSP2 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr



#6
Brian

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Tough stuff.  I have a 125 series Polaroid Land Camera, but nobody makes film for it anymore.  I contacted Polaroid and they replied:
 

 

 

The Model 125 is very similar to the Model 104 that My Dad got for Christmas in 1965. I still have it. Uses a 3v Battery- you could hot wire a 3v Lithium to test it.

Uses the "Image Size" projected frames, basically measure from top to bottom of their Head. A fancy Zone Focus. It works, I could do it when I was 9.



#7
dswan

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It already has some entrenched fans in the Art (note the capital A) community, but it's definitely a niche.  Like it or not, not only is film a cranky niche, but even dedicated cameras lose ground each year to phone cameras.  It's kind of like horses, which most of us don't need, but which some of us (though not me) keep around for the big-house, large property scenery.  I've even seen Artists (again, note the capital A) who use small, cheap, plastic box cameras that need medium format film, because it's somehow more organic or natural or something.  I don't get it, but I've seen it.  When I got my first, cheesy digital camera, I never looked back.  If I want retro, I'll crank up my software to simulate film.



#8
dragon49

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The Model 125 is very similar to the Model 104 that My Dad got for Christmas in 1965. I still have it. Uses a 3v Battery- you could hot wire a 3v Lithium to test it.

Uses the "Image Size" projected frames, basically measure from top to bottom of their Head. A fancy Zone Focus. It works, I could do it when I was 9.

My unit uses this battery:

https://www.amazon.c...uct/B07GT4Q1MX/
 

There are known internet hacks on how to mod the camera to use three 1.5 V batteries.  If I were using it, I'd mod it to save money, as the battery it's designed for is expensive.



#9
Brian

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Verify that you have a Model 125 and that it uses 4.5v batteries. The connectors for the 3v battery are identical.

 

The model 104, model 210, 215, and some others with the 2-element lens use a 3v battery that has the identical connectors as the 4.5v battery.

Back in the 1980s and 1990s a lot of Polaroid cameras would show up in the thrift stores and flea markets for $1 to $10. I have a couple boxes of them.

They use this one:

https://www.batterym...ne-battery.html

 

The 4.5v battery is listed as, these models have the 3 element lens.:

 

"

  • Compatible with Polaroid 101, 355 land camera, automatic 250, camera model 100, camera model 101, camera model 102, camera model 220, camera model 225, camera model 230, camera model 240, camera model 250, camera model 340 and more"


#10
dragon49

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Verify that you have a Model 125 and that it uses 4.5v batteries. The connectors for the 3v battery are identical.

 

The model 104, model 210, 215, and some others with the 2-element lens use a 3v battery that has the identical connectors as the 4.5v battery.

Back in the 1980s and 1990s a lot of Polaroid cameras would show up in the thrift stores and flea markets for $1 to $10. I have a couple boxes of them.

They use this one:

https://www.batterym...ne-battery.html

 

The 4.5v battery is listed as, these models have the 3 element lens.:

 

"

  • Compatible with Polaroid 101, 355 land camera, automatic 250, camera model 100, camera model 101, camera model 102, camera model 220, camera model 225, camera model 230, camera model 240, camera model 250, camera model 340 and more"

 

My model is indeed the 125 - pls see the embedded image.  I just went through the entire owner's manual, and back in the day, Polaroid never bothered to mention the batteries.  According to Amazon though, it takes a 3.0-volt battery.  https://www.amazon.c...s/dp/B00NMWKL2K Can you confirm this?

Here is a pic of my camera.

H6WkQGe.jpg?1

 

God, you are whetting my appetite to get this to work.  Anybody want to sell me some expired film at a reasonable price?



#11
Brian

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That is the battery that my Polaroid 104 takes, and is the one I expected for yours to take.

 

The 104 and 125 are nearly identical, yours has a leather strap. Polaroid made the same models with miniscule changes for Various department stores, and even for the Green Stamp store.

 

The aperture looks a little off center in this shot- verify that the film selector is in the correct position.

 

Some 10+ years ago someone on Flickr found a roll of Polaroid type 47 that had been out of date for 25 years. I sent him a camera for it, had bought two at $5 each. Made him promise to post pictures if it worked- and it did.

 

Let me see what's in the closets.

 

https://www.camerama...tomatic_104.pdf

 

Operation of your camera is identical to the model 104. Open the battery compartment and you will see 3v #532 stamped in the metal. Also check condition of the battery contacts. Dry-Fire the camera, you can "hot-wire" a 3v Lithium or 2 AA batteries to the leads. I just did this for a Model 104 (Dad;s) and a $1 Model 210 bought almost 40 years ago at a yard sale: Both working shutters. You can hear it open and close a second later if inside the house. The Model 215: no luck. Could be the wires are corroded internally, could be failed capacitor.

 

SO: Test the camera with a battery, preferably one in the house before buying the custom one.

 

THEN report back. 


Model 215 is identical to yours, has a Black bellows instead of grey.

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  • model215_batt.jpg
  • model215.jpg


#12
Brian

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Good news on the 215: the problem was the negative terminal. I stripped it down to clean copper, and the shutter works fine. 90% of the time, that's the problem on these old Polaroids.

 

Polaroid 690 Film Camera ISO100 With Box - Unopened But Vintage | eBay

 

I put a watch on this one- will be interesting to see what it sells for.

 

Other sellers- insane. $165 for a twin pack of 690 film out of date 15+ years.



#13
dragon49

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That is the battery that my Polaroid 104 takes, and is the one I expected for yours to take.

 

The 104 and 125 are nearly identical, yours has a leather strap. Polaroid made the same models with miniscule changes for Various department stores, and even for the Green Stamp store.

 

The aperture looks a little off center in this shot- verify that the film selector is in the correct position.

 

Some 10+ years ago someone on Flickr found a roll of Polaroid type 47 that had been out of date for 25 years. I sent him a camera for it, had bought two at $5 each. Made him promise to post pictures if it worked- and it did.

 

Let me see what's in the closets.

 

https://www.camerama...tomatic_104.pdf

 

Operation of your camera is identical to the model 104. Open the battery compartment and you will see 3v #532 stamped in the metal. Also check condition of the battery contacts. Dry-Fire the camera, you can "hot-wire" a 3v Lithium or 2 AA batteries to the leads. I just did this for a Model 104 (Dad;s) and a $1 Model 210 bought almost 40 years ago at a yard sale: Both working shutters. You can hear it open and close a second later if inside the house. The Model 215: no luck. Could be the wires are corroded internally, could be failed capacitor.

 

SO: Test the camera with a battery, preferably one in the house before buying the custom one.

 

THEN report back. 


Model 215 is identical to yours, has a Black bellows instead of grey.

My battery compartment has the same inscription as yours, so it indeed takes the 3.0-volt battery.  I'm going to take a toothbrush, some water, and baking soda to this one corroded terminal, unless you have a better idea.  Hoping this camera works.  I thought it was broken, but year's ago, I probably tested with a 4.5-volt battery, as it's in my Amazon order history.  I spent the $13.88 + tax on the specialized battery.  Sometimes, I'm good with DIY, other times, not so good. :)

Good catch on the aperture.  The film selector was set in between color and black and white.  I corrected that.  I'm not getting the battery delivered until the end of next week.  I'll report back on whether the camera works as soon as I know.
 

Appreciate the PDF manual.  I have the original in the case.  God bless my late grandfather who kept it.

qB2rtXH.jpg



#14
Brian

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The twin-pack of type 690 film sold for the min bid of $25, had been in a basement for 15 years. The seller sold as "as is".



#15
daveFM2

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From the golden age of 35mm film SLR cameras, the 1970s, a fully mechanical camera of the highest possible quality. They are still working, taking pictures of the same high quality as then. Nikon's professional film SLR camera 1959-1973, the Nikon F. The model depicted is from 1970. It will probably still work 50 years from now, while today's digital cameras (even the most advanced) will long ago have been discarded as outdated technology. They already are after two or three years. Perhaps film production for 35mm cameras at that time has been resumed on a grand scale? The analogue film cameras might have a bright future! What do you think?

On October 20, 2022, Leica announced they were producing a new M6 film (analog) camera. It’s based on the famous M6 from 1984. It will be available beginning November 6th.


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#16
Brian

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I picked up 5 packs of Polaroid 600 film last month- color is improved over that from just a year ago.

It's as good as my shots with Polaroid film from 20 years ago.

It has a following.