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I swear, I was using a 62mm diam. Vivitar polarizing filter on my 58mm diam. Nikon lens in 2017, but...


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#1
Those Who Squirm

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...I seem to have lost an adapter and have no way of affixing the filter to the lens.  

 

Here's the story.  

 

Back in 2017 I was getting ready to travel to Charleston SC to watch the August 21 solar eclipse, and had recently bought a Nikon D5600, which came with the usual two kit lenses, including the 70-300mm zoom lens with a front diameter of 58mm.  To shoot a solar eclipse, of course, you need an eclipse filter and I was advised to get this polarizing filter.   Looking back, I don't remember who it was or why they advised me to get this filter, and it seems odd that I would use a 62mm diameter Vivitar filter on a 58mm diameter Nikon lens.  Still, it worked; I could fasten the filter to the lens and adjust it for the degree of polarization I wanted.  But now I can't attach it to the lens.  I've rifled multiple times through my camera back but can't come up with the adapter.  As best I recall, it was a very thin circle of dark metal which I think was threaded inside and out.   

 

Where can I get a replacement?  I'm not even sure what to ask for, especially if I have to order it online.

 

There is an annular Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14, 2023 (Great North American Eclipse ) coming up in the fall of next year, and I don't even need to travel anywhere for it, so I'm going to need to resolve this before then.  Why am I asking about it now, so many months before the event?  Well, as you might have guessed I haven't used the polarizing filter much, so I can't allow myself to forget about it until a few weeks before the eclipse and then rush around in panic mode trying to find the right adapter, or another filter.



#2
Merco_61

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5 years ago, there were few good variable ND filters. What few there were, were only available in some sizes. The one you bought is one of the good ones, especially in its price range.

 

The adapter you need is a step-up ring. Get one in brass or titanium as an aluminium one *will* get stuck sooner or later. 
 

https://www.bhphotov...er_2687:58-62mm



#3
krag96

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Yes, Peter is absolutely correct, aluminum on aluminum galls terribly and making it nearly impossible to separate once this happens.  Aluminum is a soft metal and even normally working the threads cause tiny particles of its metal to flake off and cause a galling effect binding the threads together as though they were glued.  If you must use aluminum to aluminum threads, just a tooth pick dab of synthetic grease in 2-3 equal spaced places on the threads and just snugging the ring does wonders.  I haven't had one gall yet using this method. 

 

To remove a hopelessly stuck filter, (this gets ugly) you must remove the glass, (there's a tiny seal that keeps it in) then with a pair of dikes, securely grasp the ring in the jaws and give it a clock-wise twist pulling the threads straight apart, move the dikes a few inches and repeat until the filter falls away, (usually two twists will do it).  Be very careful not to engage the lens or adapter with the dikes, just the filter.  Those thin aluminum rings are soft and bend easily, pulling them straight  away from each-other is easy allowing the threads opposite the twists to fall straight away.  Of course your filter is destroyed, but it's apart.  I've done this with shattered filters that were stuck, time from once I have the dikes in hand to separate...about twelve seconds. 



#4
Those Who Squirm

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Thanks to both of you for the info. I see that replacing the step-up ring won't break the bank, not that I expected it would, of course. Now I can practice on shooting the sun under various types of sky/haze/cloud conditions. Of course I know that direct unfiltered sunlight can damage my sensor, and I should always use maximum polarization for this.

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