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Help buying new camera


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8 replies to this topic

#1
Jilllove

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Hi there. I’m new to the forums. I’m a retired portrait photographer but still work in fine art. I’ve used my beloved D-700 forever.

I quit keeping track about cameras when I retired. Mine works. I sold off most of my equipment long ago but have 4 lenses left.

I’m in need of a new camera. I’d like suggestions on models. I have not nor will I ever photograph on some program kind of mode. I only know manual. So I want a solid pro or semi pro camera.

Admittedly, I’d love something lightweight. I’m in my late 60s and have arthritis in my camera-holding hand.

I have no idea what is out there or what is comparable today to my D-700.

Your guidance and expertise would be appreciated if you photograph manually and know the D-700 features. Thanks so much.

#2
Merco_61

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Finding something with the build quality and feel of the D700 is difficult today. If you don't need more than the 12 MP sensor the D700 had, there are still lightly used D700-s out there. If you want similar ergonomics with super-high resolution, the D850 is the right choice. I went with a D750 with a grip as I didn't have the funds for a D850 *and* a new computer that could handle the large files at the same time. If my hand was slightly smaller or larger, I would have gone with the D780 instead, but the bottom corner hits a nerve cluster when I use a D6xx/D750/D780 without the grip. 

 

If your lenses are AF-S, you might want to look at a Z6II or Z7II with the FTZ adapter to use the lenses you have. Your arthritic hand will love the lower mass, but the controls might feel a bit cramped on the small body.



#3
krag96

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The Z5 might also be an option, Peter.  I'm looking into one of those myself, (not super seriously because my best lenses aren't AF-S, but looking...). 

 

This from another D700 lover!  I have two of them with converted battery grips to handle the ENEL-4 batteries.  If you can shoot a D700, you won't need much of a learning curve with any other FX camera.  The biggest difference would be video capability. 



#4
Merco_61

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The Z5 might also be an option, Peter.  I'm looking into one of those myself, (not super seriously because my best lenses aren't AF-S, but looking...). 

 

 

I was thinking of the arthritis and the even smaller Z5. 



#5
krag96

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I was thinking of the arthritis and the even smaller Z5. 

Of course, the Z5 is just a bit lighter than either Z6II or Z7II, but heavier than the Z50. 

 

Edit to say, the Z5 is the same size as the Z6II and Z7II and does take a battery grip, MB-N10. 

 

You may be thinking of the Z50, Peter.  The Z5 seems to be Nikon's best kept secret, full frame Z camera, maybe like a mirrorless version of the D750?



#6
Dogbytes

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I would highly recommend the D850. Apart from its phenomenal performance, it’s large enough to be comfortable to hold and use whilst not being particularly heavy. It’s well built too.



#7
Merco_61

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Of course, the Z5 is just a bit lighter than either Z6II or Z7II, but heavier than the Z50. 

 

Edit to say, the Z5 is the same size as the Z6II and Z7II and does take a battery grip, MB-N10. 

 

You may be thinking of the Z50, Peter.  The Z5 seems to be Nikon's best kept secret, full frame Z camera, maybe like a mirrorless version of the D750?

Yes, they are the same size, but the controls are laid out worse for arthritic hands and it just felt even smaller when I handled one.



#8
krag96

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I believe Nikon designed the Z5 with one handed operation in mind, having the controls all on the right side.  It probably does make for a crowded area on the right and may be a handicap to an arthritic hand.  I confess, of all the aches and pains I suffer, my right hand has escaped the rigors of getting old...to this point anyway. :P



#9
Merco_61

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I don't have any problems either, but Mother have given up on using her Pentaxes as she just doesn't have the control for the tight button and lever placements on an LX or Mz-5.