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D7200 metering


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9 replies to this topic

#1
PebblzNnutz

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I just noticed that the metering was different on a few of my photos that I recently took with my D7200 in Av mode. The attached images show what I mean. The last photo is taken from my D7200 Info menu. Is there something off on my cameras metering mode?
Also, I would've thought that the photos would be on the darker side since I had the exposure comp set to zero.

49770884661_7382c334cf_b.jpg

 

49770882216_9f4011f35f_b.jpg

 

49770347138_1ff3336d85_b.jpg



#2
Merco_61

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As the ISO, shutter and aperture are identical in the two photos, the light must have changed. Did the sun come out of the clouds or the cloud cover get thinner for _DSC7681? Do you have AE-L assigned to shutter button half-press?

 

The light photos is probably just Matrix metering identifying the light background and compensating.



#3
TBonz

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For some strange reason, I do not see any photos...Obviously Peter saw them...



#4
PebblzNnutz

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As the ISO, shutter and aperture are identical in the two photos, the light must have changed. Did the sun come out of the clouds or the cloud cover get thinner for _DSC7681? Do you have AE-L assigned to shutter button half-press?

 

The light photos is probably just Matrix metering identifying the light background and compensating.

 

No, the sun hasn't peeked through the overcast skies for the last few days. The AEL button is assign to AF-ON or do you mean shutter-release button AEL, it's set to Off. I thought either mostly white or black would be compensated to grey instead.

For some strange reason, I do not see any photos...Obviously Peter saw them...

That's odd. I took a screenshot of the first two that shows the histogram and settings and attached it for you. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Screen Shot 2020-04-14 at 9.51.46 AM.jpeg


#5
Merco_61

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Mostly white or mostly dark gets turned to grey when you use center-weighted metering without correcting for the situation. Matrix often identifies these situations automagically and corrects them.

I tend to use mostly center-weighted or spot metering as I get more predictable results that way after using variants of these metering methods since I got my first Spotmatic a little over 40 years ago.

 

The reason I asked about the light level is that you somehow have different light levels with all three exposure parameters identical. If you have exposure lock assigned to the shutter button, the camera won't change the exposure until you release the button , which can give the result seen here if the cloud cover differs in thickness, letting more or less light through. If you don't have the exposure lock active and a fast shutter like 1/500, this is much less likely as the light meter is active until the mirror is raised.

 

How much does the exposure differ in reality? If you load both files in your editing software and try to equalize the exposures, how much compensation do you need?



#6
PebblzNnutz

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The shutter release button AE-L is set to off, if that's the one your referring to. The AE-L/AF-L button is set for autofocus. In Lightroom it's about 1 stop difference between the two photos above. There are a few more photos that I took earlier in the day that were taken within a few seconds of each other that have the same odd exposures as the ones above above, all with the same settings and the same overcast lighting.
I'll start using center weighted from now on to see if I get better exposures with my D7200. I find it a bit odd since I've never seen my Pentax bodies ever doing this.



#7
fallout666

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like Merco_61 said. somehow or someway the lighting change i get that all time when doing sports photography, since could shooting in same spot and  out of nowhere i get change in light that did not see coming. since sometimes be set up for action shot and when follow person could run into spot where lighting change little. why i use auto-ISO for that issue 



#8
PebblzNnutz

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I finally got to try my D7200 the other day using center weighted metering and the outcome was the same using the same Av mode as in my first port. Switching to Manual mode fared a lot better. For those of you thinking it's the lighting that is affecting the exposures again, these were taken within a second or two on a cloudless blue sky day. It's as if the body is metering in Spot rather than Matrix or Center weighted. Any ideas why this is happening?
Next time I think I'll try auto iso while using Matrix and Center weighted metering.

 

Screen Shot 2020-05-03 at 9.11.04 PM.jpeg



#9
Bengan

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Personally I don't think this has to do with change of light or exposure mode. To me this looks more like a lens problem. It looks like the aperture isn't stopping down fast enough. The second shot is always overexposed.

Have you tried another lens?



#10
PebblzNnutz

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Personally I don't think this has to do with change of light or exposure mode. To me this looks more like a lens problem. It looks like the aperture isn't stopping down fast enough. The second shot is always overexposed.

Have you tried another lens?

It looks like your assessment is spot on. I just tried taking some photos with my Tamron 70-200 at roughly 120mm and with my Tamron 150-600 at 150mm, neither one took any photos at different exposures than my 24-120 lens that I had been using for the above photos taken at 120mm. Taking some photos with the 24-120 lens at slower intervals the exposures are more consistent. Thank you, Bengan.

I'll have to think about sending this lens in for service once Nikon opens their repair service or just use it as is.