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Back when they advertized on T.V.


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31 replies to this topic

#21
krag96

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I dug my Cokin books and brochures out and found color Vaseline kits they also sold for their filter system.  They're still in business, but it seems some of the more, "creative" filters are no longer sold and prices have risen X 10 since I bought them.  I would suggest checking e-bay and buying used if you want to try them. 


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#22
Ron

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Thanks, but I rarely use "creative" filters anymore. I can't even remember the last time I used a polarizer. There was a time though ... do you remember Spiraltone? (I think that's how it's spelled?)

 

--Ron



#23
krag96

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I finally got out a couple of the David Hamilton books I have, (haven't looked at them in years) and leafed through them.  He certainly had an affection for soft focus, diffused, pastels, or a foggy type Image.  I then looked through my Cokin catalog and found images very similar using their filters, diffusers #'s 81 83 84, pastels #'s 86 87, possibly dreams #91 along with a warm tone filter.  I'm not saying Hamilton used Cokin filters, but his style should be closely replicated with them.  I got some beautiful  results with them many years ago on the Gettysburg Battlefield about this time of year photographing the flowering trees in blossom on Cemetery Ridge near Little Round Top. 



#24
krag96

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Seems Minolta either owned Cokin or was their distributor according to an old brochure.  The address was Cokin Creative Filter System-Minolta corporation-P.O. Box 600-Garden City, N.Y. 11530 

 

Digging out my old Canon F1n kit, I found I have the diffusers, Pastels, Fogs, and warm tones along with a 62mm adapter ring which will work on my old Nikkor 75-300 f4.5-5.6 lens and my Tamron 90mm f2.8 so I may give them a try sometime soon.  I may get to enjoy them as much with my Nikons as I did with my Canon. 


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#25
Ron

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Be sure to check those filters for contamination (fungus, etc.) before using them or you may have some unwanted creative effects!

 

--Ron



#26
krag96

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No fungus, but one has a scuff near the bottom.  Probably won't be noticeable on a 62mm dia. lens, but on a 77mm it might show.  

 

Another dumb idea I might try, (chime in if you've tried this) a thin piece of cheese cloth over the lens held tight in place with a rubber band.  With digital, it's not like I'm burning up film to try it.  Also thought of a single layer of an old nylon stocking as a diffuser.  I may give either a try and report back. 



#27
Merco_61

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Black stretchy fabric like a stocking usually works best for that dreamy quality. I used two step-up rings with the fabric locked in the threads between them to experiment. A rubber band probably won't keep the fabric taut. A cable tie might work. You might like the diffusing vignette effect of a hole in the centre of the fabric.

 

All of these can be done in post, but getting it at capture time can be satisfying.



#28
krag96

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Thanks, Peter, I can do the step up rings as I seem to have a few with no particular other purpose right now. 



#29
Ron

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I've done exactly the same thing that Peter described, in mostly the same way. Worked beautifully. I didn't have the right step up rings so I used two same size filter rings instead. The vignetting I got from this combination was considerable but not too objectionable on short to medium telephoto lenses. The way this combination scattered light, especially around light sources was amazing.

 

--Ron



#30
krag96

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I'll ad an old stocking to my list of things to try and get a 77mm step up ring.



#31
Crotlaus

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My favorite camera was an Olympus OM-4 Ti. How many of you old timers have ever seen a large photo print taken with Kodachrome 64 or 25 and printed directly on Cibachrome?  There was a photo gallery in Sedona Arizona where all the prints that were on sale were printed on Cibachrome. The owner told me that all were taken by a 4 X 5 format. They were out of my price range.



#32
Merco_61

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My favorite camera was an Olympus OM-4 Ti. How many of you old timers have ever seen a large photo print taken with Kodachrome 64 or 25 and printed directly on Cibachrome?  There was a photo gallery in Sedona Arizona where all the prints that were on sale were printed on Cibachrome. The owner told me that all were taken by a 4 X 5 format. They were out of my price range.

I have not only seen, but printed lots on P30, both Cibachrome and later Ilfochrome. We mostly used Agfachrome CT 18, though. A 6x7 cm CT 18 slide printed on 60X75 cm P30 stock will always wow the viewer. Mother still has one of my P30 30X45 prints from a 135 slide on her wall. It has been there for nearly 25 years now and the colours are as crisp as when I got it out of the print washer.