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15 replies to this topic

#1
brickie58

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Is velvet still the best ?

#2
Nikon Shooter

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Is velvet still the best ?



Velvet?

What is the set up?
Background to what?
Distance behind the subject?



#3
brickie58

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Mostly still life chess sets jewellery etc close distance and actually on top off ie jewellery.thanks. used to use velvet because you get no bounce back of light if you know what I mean.

#4
Nikon Shooter

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Yes, I know what you mean but getting the dust
off a velvet is a pain in the… foot? :P

I prefer to use an anthracite paper and work with
the effect of the inverse square law.



#5
brickie58

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No Reflection, was the word I was after, senior moment sorry.

#6
Nikon Shooter

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No Reflection, was the word I was after, senior moment sorry.


I got that my friend but try paper… no reflection! :)



#7
brickie58

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Thanks

#8
Ron

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I generally use black velvet for my orchid photography backgrounds because it absorbs light so well. With a little care you can keep your velvet from getting too dirty but dirt and spots are a consideration. For a long time I used mat black paper and I still do use paper when I need a lighter color background but, for me at least, paper is a real pain to use.

 

--Ron



#9
Merco_61

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Velvet is hard to beat for light absorption, but it is very difficult to keep clean as the others have said. It might be worth it to take a trip to a fabric store and look for matte black synthetics that are easier to keep spotless, but still more light absorbing than paper.



#10
brickie58

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Thanks will have to find a fabric shop near me, I have been looking online at some woven materials or vinyl comes up a lot too ? What's the opinions on vinyl easy to keep clean etc.thanks.

#11
Nikon Shooter

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What's the opinions on vinyl easy to keep clean etc.


Yes but highly reflective!



#12
brickie58

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Ah back to that word again haha

#13
Nikon Shooter

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Ah back to that word again haha


When reflections are the only thing between you
and your shot, begin unwanted compromises.



#14
brickie58

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Very true, adapt and overcome !

#15
Ron

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Peter mentions other types of cloth and I do carry a couple of yards of black non-velvet fabric for those times when my fairly small piece of velvet won't give me the coverage I need or for sitting plant vases on. Unfortunately, it's nowhere nearly as effective as even dirty velvet. I know some other photographers who use shade fabric as backgrounds but unwanted reflections are still a pain. Some popup professional backgrounds made for portrait photography are probably better but I haven't tried any of those... although I've considered them from time to time.

 

There are a couple of ways to handle background reflections. The best way, of course, is to not have them to begin with. Picking a good light absorbent material and aiming your lights so as to minimize the amount of light falling on your background is a good start. However, there will always be occasions when, for whatever reason, you end up with those pesky reflections. In that case you may need to resort to removing the reflections in post. Sometimes, assuming you're going for a completely black background, just dialing up black in Lightroom will do the trick. Also, Lightroom's spot removal tool and healing/cloning tools can be invaluable in removing background reflections. They are not ideal but generally give good results if used intelligently and judiciously.

 

--Ron



#16
brickie58

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Thanks Ron good info there
  • Ron likes this