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Evening Humming Bird Pictures-settings


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3 replies to this topic

#1
ml_work

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We have humming birds coming to the feeders all day but right at the end of day they really come in. I have taken pictures in the past with my Cool Pix that were pretty good, by standing by the feeders and the birds will come back after I stand there awhile. I want to with the Snap Bridge software on my phone to control the D5600 on a tripod (have never used this). With me being away I think it may work better. I will be using either  of the kit lens - 18-55 or 18-140 for this. I know I could set to Sports and it should work, but wondering what is the best settings, if I have the camera in P mode or which ever is recommend. This is around 6:30 ... sunset here is around 6:45 now and I am shaded by tall pines.

Recommended Setting ?



#2
TBonz

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It is impossible to answer your question without being there at the time to read the light.  For something like this and the photos of your grand daughter in your other thread, you might want to consider learning to control your camera settings manually.  That doesn't mean you need to do it all the time and it isn't that difficult to learn  

 

Three things control your exposure.  The ISO controls how sensitive the sensor is to light - the higher the ISO the less light you need but you may begin to loose image quality as you move it higher.  The shutter speed controls how long the shutter is open - a shorter shutter speed can stop movement and a longer shutter speed can show movement.  The aperture controls the amount of light coming through the lens and  the depth of field - the portion of your image which appears in focus.  Your camera sets these for you if you are in Auto mode and sets one or more of these in the other modes and scenes.

 

Learning to control these and deciding how best to set them with the available light is how to get your best image.  Pick one of these and use your light meter as a guide to start.  A faster shutter speed will mean changes to the other two settings.  It doesn't really cost anything other than some disk space to play with the settings and see how they can impact the same view.



#3
ml_work

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TBonz, thanks for your reply and I agree I do need to learn more about my camera and understand that it would not be possible to know what the light is at my location at a given time. The birds will be gone in a week or two and by the time I get home each day it is almost too dark to do. I just thought I would ask here to have something to start with for testing. As you say it will not cost anything, just time and that is what is short of for this year, Maybe I will have a better understanding when they come through next year.



#4
fallout666

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if we had photo to go  by would help give better remark too.