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Nikon D3100 and Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DXII


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12 replies to this topic

#1
udvo

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i have the Nikon D3100 and have the lens that came with it 18-55mm. i wanted to get wider angle lens (Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DXII) and was wondering if i will gain any range at the 12mm due to the DX sensor. i fond somewhere that the focal length would be 18-36mm. i am very much an amateur so pls be patient :)



#2
Merco_61

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The increase in the angle of view is quite dramatic. You will go from 76° to 99° diagonal field of view.

The FX equivalent focal length of your 18-55 is 27-82.5 mm.

The smaller DX sensor in your D3100 will show you a narrower FOV compared to an FX sensor. To compare what focal lengths you need between the systems to capture the same FOV, you multiply the focal length by 1.5. That said, a 27mm lens on FX won't give you the same photo as an 18mm on DX as the depth of field will be shorter for the same aperture since the reproduction scales differ.

 

As long as you use either DX or FX, don't bother about the equivalent focal length nonsense. Just learn how your lenses behave on your camera. It starts to matter when you use both sizes, but not before that.

 

Focal length is a physical property of a lens and no interchangeable lenses are marked with anything but the real focal length. Whether it is a DX or an FX lens doesn't matter.



#3
udvo

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Thank you Merco_61. I really appreciate your time and knowledge. in addition to the first lens i found this one and I think i will go with this one since it has f/2.8 which would let more light in in interior photography... any opinion on this one?

 

Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8 Lens for Nikon F

#4
Merco_61

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Not as nice as the Tokina 11-20 with some distortion in the corners. It is easily corrected, though. It used to be one of the go-to lenses some years ago.

 

What raw converter do you use? I would avoid Capture NX-D with third-party zooms as the Nikon software doesn't have profiles for these lenses.



#5
udvo

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what about then staying with the Nikon and go with

Nikon AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Lens

Is the Tokina 11-20 still the better choice? i am at the very begining of my photo journey so at the moment for my needs, i was exporting jpgs into photoshop (very old version i must say too)


Nevermind :-) the Nikon 10-20mm is not compatible with my camera body. I seems the Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DXII will have to do unless you have any other suggestions in about $300 range for similar lens. Also, as i progress here, what Nikon body should I start saving for (probably used with budget of $600-$700)



#6
Snorky

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What type of photography are you interested in (portraits, landscape, wildlife, etc.)? What subjects require such a wide-angle lens?

 

The more information you can give us, the more help we can offer. :)



#7
udvo

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I need if for interior pictures of properties often small rooms to capture as much of the room as possible without the distortion or with minimal distortion. i was mostly doing drone videos but started to get requests to take pictures of properties and found my basic lenses limiting.


I was looking at the D7500 body, refurb can be $600 from B&H. need to learn bit more about it but i think it would be huge improvement from the D3100



#8
Snorky

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You'll be needing additional gear for quality interior photography such as lights or strobes, stands, and umbrellas.



#9
udvo

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For now, i will have to get by with what i have plus the lense and external flash. In time, i will get additional equipment.

#10
Snorky

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Well you gotta start somewhere.

 

I remember the good old film days when I was a commercial photographer. We carried around lots of equipment including a 4x5 view camera, tripod, heavy strobe units that sat on the floor, 3 or 4 light stands, strobe heads and umbrellas. plus a case with the film holders, light meter, and a Polaroid film back for "test prints."

 

 

8158578781_8d60186dcb_z.jpg



#11
Merco_61

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There is nothing wrong with any of the Tokinas for what you want to do. You just need good processing skills and good software to compensate for not having the right tools to get things right in-camera. Lens and lighting are more important than the body to get consistently good results. A set of cheap light stands and softboxes can be found on eBay and radio triggered Yongnuo or Godox speedlights aren't that expensive either. Capture One handles he distortion from the Tokinas really well, and is a *very* good raw converter.

 

I would rather go for a D7200 than a D7500 if money is tight. Dual card slots make for peace of mind as you can set one for backup on important shoots.



#12
udvo

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I have yongnuo, dont have the 603 transmiter but that is cheap to get so i will get it. And get the lense for now. After one or two jobs, i will get some other equipment and hold off on the body for now. I wanted body that does bracketing in it so i don't have to fiddle with it manually. I used to teach photoshop and did photo editing long time ago and am quite familiar with it even though it is old (what i know) i want to learn to get good results in camera so i don't have to in post production. Thank you for all your advice, it is very much appreciated!

#13
Snorky

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 i want to learn to get good results in camera so i don't have to in post production. 

Well, you'll rarely get what you want in-camera every time. Interiors can be challenging, especially when using strobes.

 

I use PhotoShop all the time and it's a lifesaver.