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Photo

Why differences in two images with exact body,lens and ISO Settings?

why differences two images with exact body lens isosettings?

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20 replies to this topic

#1
Tony

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Late this evening I decided to take my Nikon D200 body with my Nikon AFNikkor 55~200mm, VR, ED, SWM, IF Lens out 

 

into the backyard since the light seemed ideal with the sun on its way down.

 

The first image turned out well with the exception of leaves high in the trees turned out very soft.

 

First image settings;  1/60s, F/5.6, F/L 55mm, ISO 320.  Also, File size 559.8 KB & 1887 X 1263????

 

 

 

Second image sans any adjustments by me;  The leaves high in the trees turned out very sharp along with a tree to the left

 

of the greenhouse.

 

Settings for second Image;  1/60s, F/5.6, F/L 55mm, ISO 320.  Also, File Size 929.7 KB & 1936 X 1296.  

 

So my question is; why did the file size and dimensions change in the first image?  I can upload both images if necessary.

 

Tony



#2
Merco_61

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The file size in kB changes with how much compression is possible. A photo with less detail will get smaller than one with lots of detail. The reason for the difference in pixel dimensions baffles me, though.

 

Another question is why you shoot in a 2.4 MP mode when you have 10 MP available.



#3
Tony

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The file size in kB changes with how much compression is possible. A photo with less detail will get smaller than one with lots of detail. The reason for the difference in pixel dimensions baffles me, though.

 

Another question is why you shoot in a 2.4 MP mode when you have 10 MP available.

The images are identical.  I am not sure what you mean.  Also, I was not aware I was shooting in only a 2.4mp mode.  How do I adjust that? thnx.


Okay, I see what you are saying. I needed to get in there and change the image size, and it has been changed to Large.  Is that it?

 

thnx.



#4
Merco_61

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As the leaves were soft in the first one but not in the second, I suspect you refocused between the shots. With less detail in focus, the jpeg algorithm applies more compression.

 

You have the camera set to the small size, which is 2.4 MP even if the manual says 2.5. Read pages 28-32 in the Nikon manual for the D200 to learn how to set the compression ratio and pixel size you want.



#5
Tony

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Here is image number one.

 

 


Here is image number two.  You can see that the leaves behind and above the greenhouse are sharp and so is the tree to 

 

the left.

 

 


As the leaves were soft in the first one but not in the second, I suspect you refocused between the shots. With less detail in focus, the jpeg algorithm applies more compression.

 

You have the camera set to the small size, which is 2.4 MP even if the manual says 2.5. Read pages 28-32 in the Nikon manual for the D200 to learn how to set the compression ratio and pixel size you want.

I did change the size of the images.  However, that leaves me with a lot fewer shots as the count went from 411 down to 111.  This means I need to bring along a few spare cards.  If I shoot in RAW, the count goes all the way down to 10. :(  Admittedly I am asea with the auto-focus functions on the D200. You are correct of course, I did refocus for the second shot, however no settings were changed and I kept the distance as similar to the first shot as possible.  You can see there is little difference between the two in that respect.  They are as close to mirroring each other as possible.  Unless you are implying that I used a different focus point in the second shot.  I guess anything is possible.  Am I clear on what you are saying?

Attached Thumbnails

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  • DSC_9043.JPG


#6
Merco_61

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With so much more foliage in focus and sharp in the second image, it is not surprising that the first one is much more compressed.


The second image is focused quite a bit further away from the camera than the first. Look in the upper left corner and see how much more in focus the leaves are, combined with the OOF foliage in the background.



#7
Tony

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With so much more foliage in focus and sharp in the second image, it is not surprising that the first one is much more compressed.


The second image is focused quite a bit further away from the camera than the first. Look in the upper left corner and see how much more in focus the leaves are, combined with the OOF foliage in the background.

Alright, then it comes down to me and my focusing struggles with the camera.  I long for the days when I had my Nikon EM 35mm SLR and Nikon 50mm Series E f/1.8 lens.  Life and photography was a lot simpler and enjoyable then.  Cheers and many thanks for your assistance.  TT


With so much more foliage in focus and sharp in the second image, it is not surprising that the first one is much more compressed.


The second image is focused quite a bit further away from the camera than the first. Look in the upper left corner and see how much more in focus the leaves are, combined with the OOF foliage in the background.

 

Alright, then it comes down to me and my focusing struggles with the camera.  I long for the days when I had my Nikon EM 35mm SLR and Nikon 50mm Series E f/1.8 lens.  Life and photography was a lot simpler and enjoyable then.  Cheers and many thanks for your assistance.  TT

Peter, I see what you mean about the second photo being further away from the camera.  That to me is really puzzling, because my focus point was the same on both images.  Right between the square above the greenhouse door.  Could it be lens distortion?  I remained in the same shooting position for both shots.  Another mystery. tt



#8
TBonz

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Just because you were pointing at the same area does not mean the camera chose the exact same focus point...



#9
Bengan

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What AF-mode is the camera set to?



#10
Merco_61

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I did change the size of the images.  However, that leaves me with a lot fewer shots as the count went from 411 down to 111.  This means I need to bring along a few spare cards.  If I shoot in RAW, the count goes all the way down to 10. :(  Admittedly I am asea with the auto-focus functions on the D200. You are correct of course, I did refocus for the second shot, however no settings were changed and I kept the distance as similar to the first shot as possible.  You can see there is little difference between the two in that respect.  They are as close to mirroring each other as possible.  Unless you are implying that I used a different focus point in the second shot.  I guess anything is possible.  Am I clear on what you are saying?

How small are the cards you use in the D200? It works well with up to 32 GB cards. The only reason the manual doesn't say anything about the max size is that there were no large CF cards when the camera was introduced. 64 GB cards can be made to work, but you only get 32 GB of space.



#11
Tony

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How small are the cards you use in the D200? It works well with up to 32 GB cards. The only reason the manual doesn't say anything about the max size is that there were no large CF cards when the camera was introduced. 64 GB cards can be made to work, but you only get 32 GB of space.

The card I used for these shots are 512MB.  I have installed a Lexar 1GB Professional, 80X Card.  That doubled the number of shots.  I do have one question I am somewhat embarrassed to ask but here goes:  

 

Which setting do I want when it comes to Image Quality?  Do I want JPEG Normal, Fine or Basic?  I could not determine a difference, but I do want the best available.  Many thnx, TT


Just because you were pointing at the same area does not mean the camera chose the exact same focus point...

I have it set a AF-Dynamic.  I do not use Group Dynamic or Closest Object in the image.  I have used those settings and my experience with them has been

 

that they are inconsistent.  I was aiming at a flat surface, so I cannot see or understand why the Focus Point would change.

 

Thnx. tt


What AF-mode is the camera set to?

Not ignoring your question sir.  I did answer in the field below.  Thanks for bringing up an important point.

 

TT



#12
Tony

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At this point I believe I will do this again only difference is I will use a tripod and see how it goes.

 

A great many thanks to everyone for the assistance.  Will see what happens this evening.  :)

 

TT



#13
Merco_61

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As all the jpeg variants use a lossy compression, use the least amount of compression you can until it is time to save the file for final use. This means using jpeg Fine.



#14
Bengan

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I have it set a AF-Dynamic.  I do not use Group Dynamic or Closest Object in the image.  I have used those settings and my experience with them has been

 

that they are inconsistent.  I was aiming at a flat surface, so I cannot see or understand why the Focus Point would change.

 

Thnx. tt

 

I suggest that you make another try with Singel area AF. The description of Dynamic AF states: 

"User selects focus area manually but camera uses informatoion from multiple focus areas to determine focus"



#15
Tony

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I suggest that you make another try with Singel area AF. The description of Dynamic AF states: 

"User selects focus area manually but camera uses informatoion from multiple focus areas to determine focus"

Okay, I misspoke when I stated that I use AF Dynamic.  I do use Single AF.  However, even with this setting, it does get cumbersome.  There is a little rectangle to the right of the focal area and when I press down on the shutter release to activate auto-focus, it blinks red for about a nano-second.  Now when

I attempt to focus on an area, the system hunts and even passes the sharp position, then what I do is place the rectangle on the area to be focused and it works, but not always.  I just picked up the camera, aimed at an area, and now the little rectangle is at the bottom left position.  I have the Magic Lantern instruction manual and cannot find any reason why this happens.  This stuff is getting more frustrating every day.  Even my Canon gear which recent technology is so much easier when using auto-focus.  I will keep working with it.  Thnx, Tony



#16
Bengan

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It sounds that you somehow have moved the focusing point. On my models it is reset to center position by pressing the OK button. See if may be the case.



#17
Tony

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It sounds that you somehow have moved the focusing point. On my models it is reset to center position by pressing the OK button. See if may be the case.

On my NIkon D200 I do not have an OK Button. tt



#18
Bengan

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Okidok, how do you select/move focusing point on your camera?



#19
Bengan

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I had a look in the manual. Suggest you try this.

 

Make sure that the focus selector lock is not set to L

Push the center of the multi selector (my guess is that this has the same function as those on my bodies = OK)

 

If that doesn't work, try to move the focusing point with the arrows on the multi selector.



#20
Tony

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I had a look in the manual. Suggest you try this.

 

Make sure that the focus selector lock is not set to L

Push the center of the multi selector (my guess is that this has the same function as those on my bodies = OK)

 

If that doesn't work, try to move the focusing point with the arrows on the multi selector.

I went ahead and followed your instructions, and they worked to a T.  That really helps a great deal.  The funny thing is, is that I did all this through the system's program in Auto Fine Tuning, Choosing center focus area along with first or second curtain.  The square showed up dead center, however after approximately ten snaps, the square turned into a rectangle and ended up either on the right side or bottom left.  Okay, so this seems to be the panacea for all of my auto focus issues with this body for now.  Just pushing in on the center button places the square back into the center of the focus frame.  My goodness, many thanks for your assistance and everyone else's.

 

Cheers, 

 

Tony







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