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D3500 and HSS on Yongnuo YN685N?


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5 replies to this topic

#1
cprstn54

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Newbie as to both devices.

 

Is there a way to use the flash HSS with the D3500? That is, can I set a shutter faster than 200 that will properly  trigger flash HSS and not be overridden by the camera with its max 200 flash shutter?

 

Ken C

 



#2
ScottinPollock

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I'm pretty sure the D3xxx series cameras don't support HSS with any flash unit.

Nikon's long standing practice of disabling software enabled features in entry level cameras to get users to upgrade to more expensive models (but to be clear, everyone does it to some extent).

#3
cprstn54

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I am the OP. Found this:

 

"There are two ways to do HSS for those Nikon Cameras that do not support HSS in their menu's.

1. Buy a Non Nikon Flash, say a Yonguono ($ 70 - $ 130) or some other flash, but they must support HSS and certified to work with Nikon.

When you use a non nikon flash, the nikon camera is fooled into believing that there is no flash attached. So if you raise the shutter speed to say 1/4000 sec, the camera just fires the flash, and you got your high speed flash to work above the standard sync speed of 1/200 or 1/250.

2. If you already have a Nikon Flash, which is HSS enabled like the SB 700 SB 800 SB 910 etc, if you place that on a nikon camera and shutter speed is set to 1/4000, it wont fire. Not only will it not fire, the camera will not let you set the shutter speed beyond its sync speed of say 1/200s. Try it out for your self, the shutter speed will be stuck at 1/200 s and wont budge above it no matter what you do.

So the way to fool the camera in this case, is to cover the two pins at the rear of the camera with tape (do this at your risk) and in the alternate you can buy a flash adapter that can be mounted on your nikon flash adapter, which disables the two pins, the part number of this eludes me, but you can google for it.

The above fools the Nikon camera into thinking that there is no flash attached and the flash will fire above flash sync speed."

 

I think the C-N2 adapter ($5 from China) might work.

 

Tried very fast shutter on Manual (1/800)  with a dumb flash. Flash indeed fired and only the top 1/4 of the image was illuminated by it, indicating that the fast shutter was not overridden.

 

When the adapter arrives from China, I will be able to fiddle with the YN685N and see if the flash on HSS will auto adjust or if I have to go full manual. Folks say it is easy to use once you understand it, but the learning curve is steep and the manual appears to be translated from the Chinese by computer: "Please avoid the excessive user of the output with maximum power."



#4
cprstn54

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I am the OP.

 

The above-mentioned work-arounds -- while fooling the camera -- do not appear to fool the YN685, which will not even show the menu for HSS unless smart-connected to a Nikon with an HSS option.

 

Not sure why Yongnuo would limit HSS in this way and not give a manual option as to duration and power.



#5
dcbear78

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As stated it isn't a limitation from Yongnuo (or Godox or anyone else). It is a limitation from Nikon. HSS is actually a series of flash pulses all within the chosen shutter speed that combine for a full exposure. Your camera needs to talk to your camera to know the frequency at which to pulse the flash. It's not just a limitation of the shutter speed.

 

It is entirely possible on your camera. There is nothing stopping it from being able to do it other than Nikon (and pretty much every other manufacturer) choose to intentionally gimp lower end models.



#6
Snorky

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It is entirely possible on your camera. There is nothing stopping it from being able to do it other than Nikon (and pretty much every other manufacturer) choose to intentionally gimp lower end models.

 

That should be illegal. Seriously.

 

 

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