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#1
Nikon Shooter

Nikon Shooter

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     Photography is a wonderful discovery,

     a science which occupies the highest intelligences,

     an art that sharpens the most shrewd minds

     and whose application is within the reach of the last of the fools!”

                                      — Félix Tournachon, aka Nadar (1857) — 

 

During a class for photography enthusiasts of college and university

levels, I explained that the very best and the very worst cameras are 

of the “point and shoot” type. Best because they are ready at any ti-

me and worst because they produce rather lousy pictures.

 

So, if one wants to achieve higher quality photographs, greater invest-

meets must follow; providing extended everything from dynamic range 

to ISO through brighter lenses, very fast shutter speeds, longer and so

much faster frame rates, auto-focus, etc, etc, etc. All the technical re-

finements must be included.

 

“Yes, I understand what you say but doesn’t that lead to ever more com-

plicated cameras?” asked a student.

 

“We all agree that photography is a science which occupies the higher
in
telligences; it is those users who need all that stuff to accommodate
the artistic intents of their sharp, shrewd minds.” I answered.

 

Another asked: “Ok, let’s say that you have in front of you the flagships

of several cameras manufacturers which is the first and most important

feature you will be looking for, even trigger an eventual purchase?

 

All sections in the menus should have enough flexibility for me to confi-

gure all shooting parameters so it will behave like a good point & shoot!



#2
Merco_61

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Once upon a time there were quite a few good point-and-shoots. Unfortunately, there are no digital equivalents to the Konica Hexar, Canon Canonet, Nikon 35Ti and the Minox GT. They were very pocketable, were easy to use and produced results that was close to a SLR. Fuji's X100 is the closest, except the pocketable part... The Nikon Coolpix A would have been close, if it hadn't been for the 74° FOV that is too wide for a really usable pocket camera. It is irritating that they had a working recipe for a good, saleable camera but can't transfer it to the digital age.

 

To me, the ideal camera is good when taking full control, but still possible to tailor to the level of control one wants at the time.



#3
Nikon Shooter

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To me, the ideal camera is good when taking full control, but still possible to tailor to the level of control one wants at the time.

 

 

Yes, right.

 

The way I work, all is manual but the ISO… on auto.
Very quickly, I can tweak the compensation value.