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D3100 Grainy Photos

grainy photos noise reduction

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3 replies to this topic

#1
mamasnowwolf

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I'm new to the world of DSLR, but not photography. My favorite, Canon AE-1, has become expensive to use with the cost of film and developing. Though, to take "nice" pictures, it may be worth it.

 

My questions come from the grain or noise in the pictures. I do understand ISO, and aperture. I'm not sure much changed from the days of film (maybe I'm wrong) I've tried changing the aperture, the ISO, and even did the unthinkable and switched to a manual setting. I'm shooting outdoors on a very sunny day I shouldn't have this much grain in my photos, but when I print them out, it's terrible. Can't hardly tell the people, and plants are nothing like what we see. 

 

We are headed to Yellowstone in a couple of weeks. I was hoping that was enough time to learn how to take a few decent pictures with the new D3100 Camera. I'm looking for suggestions on what I can do to reduce the noise in pictures I want to print. I won't be printing all of them, but probably a select few for my collection. 

 

Suggestions on how to cure this problem would be welcome.

 

 



#2
Adam

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The sensor in the D3100 is not known for impressive high-ISO performance, and is quite dated by modern standards.  Nevertheless, you should be able to get good photos with the camera; this might require extra attention to technique before the images start looking better than say something out of a modern smartphone.  The most important thing is to use a fast enough shutter speed (to avoid motion blur), and ensure that your subject is properly focused.  To get the most out of your camera, be sure to always use raw mode and post-process on the computer.

 

If noise is the only issue, you can use a program such as Topaz DeNoise to eliminate a lot of the noise in your photos. 

 

If you do want clean-looking files straight out of camera, try to stick to ISO 1600 or lower and use a tripod whenever possible if lighting is limited.

 

Here's a great guide with some tips on getting exposure settings right:

The Fundamentals of Exposure - Introduction - In-Depth Articles



#3
TBonz

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Can you provide examples and the EXIF information (aperture, shutter, ISO) and that would allow us to better assist.  I agree with Adam that the D3100 is nothing like current high ISO capable bodies.  I also agree that 1600 ISO or less should work out well in terms of grain - unless you are cropping to a small part of the frame...



#4
Merco_61

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Can you provide examples and the EXIF information (aperture, shutter, ISO) and that would allow us to better assist.  I agree with Adam that the D3100 is nothing like current high ISO capable bodies.  I also agree that 1600 ISO or less should work out well in terms of grain - unless you are cropping to a small part of the frame...

... or underexposing and pulling the exposure up in post.