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Nikon D850 fell in water, need advice!


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12 replies to this topic

#1
Rnaval

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Need some advice on what I should do. Yesterday I fell in a stream at Banff National Park along with my Nikon D850, camera was in the water for 1-2 seconds. It was already powered off luckily. I promptly removed the battery and memory stick, wiped down everything on the camera and lens, then I let it dry overnight in front of a fan. I have not tried to turn it on. Should I take it in for repair? I’m told they use alcohol to dry it out. Appreciate any advice here from the pros.

Kind Regards

#2
Fletch

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I seen a site on line that said you can use alcohol as long as it is very high quality and has little to no impurities then dry it. Another site said if you dumped it in salt water flush it with fresh distilled water for no more than 5 seconds and then place it in a bag of rice for a very long time to dry it out making sure the rice does not get near your sensor.  

 

If it was me I'd rush it to the nearest camera repair shop as I'd be afraid to try either of those suggestions myself.



#3
Rnaval

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I should mention that it was fresh water stream from a waterfall, not salt water. I’m not too confident with using the rice method or even silica gel bags to dry the equipment. I’m thinking of sending it to Nikon but don’t want them to charge me an arm and a leg. Is this type of maintenance costly, does anyone know?

#4
Nikon Shooter

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Do you mean the combo was very briefly immersed?

 

I recently was caught in a sudden and violent rain… without my trusty
rain cover. Sure, I rushed for shelter but my 600mm / D850 combo got
quite wet. Once in the truck, I wiped it off and went back to the studio.

 

The next day, it all seemed to be all right… I think the weather seals did
help in my case. If immersed for a short time close to the surface, maybe

you'll have the same chance.

 

In any case, open/detach the gear to dry. Since soft water is not "pure"
water, one may expect inconsequent traces of droplets easily cleaned if
they are reachable. All the best! :)



#5
Rnaval

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Yes, the lens and the camera were only very briefly immersed in the water. I’ve dried it now with a fan, a blow dryer as well as leaving indoors facing the sun for hours. It has powered on and all seems well.

The big question on my mind is whether I should take it in for a cleaning service now or risk a major service charge later should it corrode.

#6
Nikon Shooter

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The big question on my mind is whether I should take it in for a cleaning service now or risk a major service charge later should it corrode.

 

 

My experience did not go so far so I could only speculate

and this is not what you need, I think. Sorry buddy!  :(



#7
jchery2

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I would bring it to repair, just for assurance purposes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I hope that everything works out. I know that you are in a scary and uncomfortable predicament. Best wishes on the overall turnout.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

#8
ScottinPollock

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Me too. If water did ingress the electronics, it could take quite a while for corrosion to occur to the point where traces and components fail. At that point you're looking at an expensive board swap as I don't think any OEMs do board level repairs anymore.

#9
Merco_61

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I would definitely send it in for a checkup. Corrosion *will* make the repair much more expensive if you wait.

 

It might be worth investigating if your homeowner's insurance covers water damage to a camera. Some policies do.



#10
Rnaval

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Thanks for your guidance guys, I ended up giving the camera and lens to Nikon for a checkup and cleaning, it was a minimal charge of $150 combined which gives me great peace of mind.

#11
Rnaval

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Here’s an update, no evidence of water was found inside the camera which indicates that this camera has good weather proofing seals. The lens however was found to have water which needed to be cleaned up.

#12
Nikon Shooter

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Thanks for your guidance guys, I ended up giving the camera and lens to Nikon for a checkup and cleaning, it was a minimal charge of $150 combined which gives me great peace of mind.

 

 

The right way to go! :P



#13
Leigh

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FYI for future events: Wearing a tripod socket strap, a splash of coffee entered my Nikon D80's battery department frying it. Nikon fixed it, computer/chips/whatever, for only $200. I feel that is a bargain for a then $1,000+ camera. Learned my lesson to not fear the Nikon repair center! I live where the closest repair center is 3 hours away, but I trust Nikon more.