Jump to content

Welcome to NikonForums.com
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Landscaping photography

lens wide angle landscape

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
Angie

Angie

    New Member

  • Forum Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Country Flag
Hi!
I bought my d3000 almost 5 years ago but only recently i have been putting real thought into my shots. I enjoy landscaping photography and I want to buy a wide angle lens. Can you recommend me something on a budget? Also do I have to use Nikon lenses? Or are there cheaper options?

#2
Ron

Ron

    Nikonian

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,384 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationMagic City

Hi Angie, welcome to the forum.

 

I'm surprised someone hasn't already replied... unless you also posted your questions somewhere else on the forum and I missed it.

 

Your D3000 probably came with an 18-55mm lens. The 18mm setting is fairly wide so you can use that to start with. In fact, my suggestion would be to start with that lens and get as much out of it as you can before moving on to something else. However, there are wider lenses that you can also use and no, you do not have to use Nikon branded lenses. Any lens that's designed to work with your D3000 will work. Some of these lenses are cheaper and some are more expensive.

 

I would also suggest that you purchase a sturdy tripod and a polarizing filter for your lens. A Nikon ML-L3 wireless remote will also come in handy and allow you to use lower shutter speeds than would be possible when hand holding the camera. None of these items need be expensive to start with. 

 

--Ron



#3
Angie

Angie

    New Member

  • Forum Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Country Flag
Hello!!
Thanks for your reply! I wasn't sure that this was the correct category!
You are right I have the 18-55mm lens but I grew tired of it! Plus I'm planning a trip to Scotland and I want to try something different!! I have a nice tripod already -a gift- and actually I was thinking to buy a WiFi adapter to connect my camera to my phone and to work as a remote control.

#4
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,711 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

The thing to look out for when looking for lenses on a budget for the D3xxx and D5xxx bodies is that the lenses need to have a focusing motor built-in. Nikon designate them AF-S, third-party manufacturers have their own nomenclature. One thing to be aware of is that the AF-P 10-20 is not a good choice *for the D3000* for landscape photography as there is no way to turn the VR off on the older cameras. It is a good lens, and cheap, but it needs one of the current bodies to use on a tripod.

 

The Tokina 11-xx/2.8 in any version would be my recommendation on a budget. The 11-20 is even better than the earlier versions, but they are all very good for their price.



#5
Malice

Malice

    Loyal Member

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 202 posts
  • Country Flag

Site Supporter

Just as a quick heads-up, be prepared that taking pictures at the (ultra) wide end is quite different from using the longer focal lengths. Also when it comes to landscapes.

 

At least for me, it's some sort of constant struggle using the Sigma 10-20mm on my D3100.



#6
Merco_61

Merco_61

    Nikonian

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,711 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationUppsala, Sweden

Site Supporter

Shooting ultrawide will certainly make you think and use leading lines and foreground elements in your compositions. This mental space is a benefit for all photography.



#7
fallout666

fallout666

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 376 posts
  • Country Flag
  • Locationcfl area of space coast

just like merco_61 said about lens. i have dx version of holy trinity lens 12-24 and even thou get great shots struggle to get good ones. main reason now have d7200. so it will help out more. you find hard to get ultra wide angle lenses to work well since lens does most or all do work then camera does. 



#8
Ron

Ron

    Nikonian

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,384 posts
  • Country Flag
  • LocationMagic City

The aforementioned  problems with ultra wide angle lenses are one reason why I usually advise people to ease in to using wide angle lenses by working with medium focal lengths first. The 18-55mm lens has an equivalent 28mm full frame coverage on the wide end which is probably one of the most useful focal lengths. Back in my film days I would often wonder out with one of my Minoltas equipped with just my cheap Minolta Celtic 28mm f/2.8 because it was so much fun to use. Some of my best work was done with this lens. 

 

--Ron







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lens, wide angle, landscape